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Kavanaugh confirmation upsetting says womens studies prof

first_img“We’re still not there yet. We’re still living in a society that is more concerned with protecting [the accused] than believing their victims.”Sullivan is thankful for “gifts” like the #MeToo movement that continue to push the fight forward. “I really do believe that history will tell the story of these women as heroes, as freedom defenders, as women fighting for the rights to be heard against a government that wants to remove these women from the public sphere, that wants to deny them rights over their bodies, and wants to not hear them and wants to discredit them.”She calls the protesters that disrupted the confirmation vote Saturday as “leaders of the movement” adding that sexual violence is a never-ending problem.“Sexual violence is an every-day reality for women around the globe and we will not accept it as our reality,” she said. “We never did and we never will.”WATCH: Women galvanized by Kavanaugh vote Small victories in a hard fightIn the era of #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, more cases of sexual violence are coming forward and charges are being laid in both old and new cases, “small victories” according to Sullivan.Should women take these small victories or only accept bigger success stories? Sullivan doesn’t see much of a choice.“Unfortunately we only get the small victories so we do need to take them so we can move forward,” she said, admitting some small victories are overshadowed by the fact that still not everyone will be believed.RELATED ARTICLES:Tricky time for GOP female senators facing Kavanaugh voteThe Calgary Herald won’t back down after controversial editorialTrudeau, cabinet should denounce mocking of Blasey Ford: advocates“What concerns me is that…we are more likely to listen to white women than women of colour. We are more likely to listen to straight women than queer or trans women. We need to listen better and do better within our own communities and fight for everyone’s right to live free of sexual violence.”She said if women acknowledged their own privilege(s) and support all victims, people will be believed “if the worst happens” and someone is attacked.“We need to do better always and everywhere–there’s so much work to be done!” she said.“Let’s take the small victories because we need to feel like we’re making progress. This is a very, very hard fight and a very heavy fight just to be heard, just to be believed, just to live free of sexual violence.” CALGARY (660 NEWS) – After weeks of drama and a fierce partisan fight, Judge Brett Kavanaugh has been sworn in as Supreme Court Justice, possibly re-shaping the U.S. high court for decades to come.Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell says the battle over Kavanaugh’s confirmation turned their base on fire, disappointing news to a University of Calgary women’s studies professor.Doctor Rebecca Sullivan said that it was upsetting to watch American leaders ignore the stories of women who were speaking their truth as they cast their vote to confirm Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.“I felt so much rage and sadness watching the nation’s leaders ignore the voices of women being forced to relive their trauma…in the desperate hope–in the vain hope as it turned out–that maybe this time they’ll be listened to and they’ll be believed,” said Sullivan.She added it’s upsetting that politicians voted to confirm Kavanaugh even after hearing the horrific testimonies.WATCH: Senate confirms Kavanaugh to U.S. Supreme courtlast_img read more

Netflix plans download zones in Ontario cottage country

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Netflix is giving Ontario cottage country dwellers an entertainment fix over holiday weekends this summer.The streaming video operator says it’s opening several temporary “download zones” that allow viewers to refill their mobile devices with fresh TV series and films.It begins this weekend with a Wi-Fi hot spot at Bass Pro Shop at Vaughan Mills on Friday and the Farmers Market in Collingwood, Ontario, both Saturday and Sunday. A spokeswoman for Netflix says employees will be on site to guide users through the steps.Streaming companies have been expanding their downloadable content as more subscribers watch entertainment while in transit. Advertisement Facebookcenter_img Advertisement Restrictive mobile data plans have made it costly for most Canadians to stream on the road.Netflix began letting users download a limited selection of its TV and films last November.Other streaming video services such as Amazon Prime Video and Hoopla, which is used by some of Canada’s public libraries, also make content downloadable onto phones and tablets.Netflix says it will operate “download zones” at various Ontario cottage country locations on every holiday weekend until Labour Day.They include the Bass Pro Shop and 101 Centennial Dr. in Gravenhurst on the Canada Day weekend; Bass Pro Shop and 37 Main St. E in Huntsville on the Simcoe Day weekend; and Bass Pro Shop on the Friday of the Labour Day weekend. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

Controversial film on Sri Lanka screened in Malaysia again

Apart from Suaram, the co-organisers of the screening were NGOs Aliran, Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development, Amnesty International – Malaysia, Joint Action Group for Gender Equality, Community Communications Centre (Komas), and Lawyers for Liberty. (Colombo Gazette) Several human rights groups expressed solidarity with embattled activist Lena Hendry by screening the documentary on Sri Lanka which had landed her in trouble, Malaysiakini reported.The screening of ‘No Fire Zone: The Killing Files of Sri Lanka’ took place at Suaram’s office in Petaling Jaya in Malaysia on Saturday night. read more

That big pub crawl downtown Its just Pokemon Go fans

Nicole Warbelton plays during a “Pokemon Go” event at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb., Thursday, July 14, 2016. Nebraska Athletic Department officials opened Memorial Stadium for two hours Thursday to accommodate “Pokemon Go” players eager to capture animated monsters at the venerated field. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) That big pub crawl downtown? It’s just “Pokemon Go” fans by Brandon Bailey, The Associated Press Posted Jul 15, 2016 3:00 pm MDT Last Updated Jul 15, 2016 at 6:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email SAN FRANCISCO – If you thought it was bad dodging phone-fixated “Pokemon Go” players on the sidewalk, just wait: Legions of tipsy people could soon be chasing cartoon monsters from one tavern to the next in a series of pub crawls planned for cities across the U.S.The monsters are invisible unless you’re playing the addictive smartphone game that’s swept the U.S. and a few other nations so far. The same can’t be said for the hundreds, and in some cases thousands, of pub crawlers who have RSVP’d on Facebook for these impromptu events.Organizers in San Francisco, Brooklyn and other cities are encouraging people to dress in costumes and form teams to compete in capturing the virtual Pokemon critters. (Players use an app to scan for them in the real world.)STARTING SMALL, GETTING BIGGERWhile it isn’t clear how many people will participate, the first big test should come this weekend. More than 900 people have signalled their intentions on Facebook to attend a “Pokemon Go” pub crawl in Cincinnati on Saturday, while 800 have said they’ll turn out in Pittsburgh.“We have a lot of customers who are into it. Our entire staff plays it,” said Jeff Smith, a manager at the 16-Bit Bar and Arcade, the first stop on Saturday’s “Pokemon Go” stroll through Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighbourhood.Almost 6,000 people have RSVP’d on Facebook to participate in a Pokemon pub crawl in San Francisco on Wednesday night, organized by 21-year-old Sara Witsch, who says she’s still devising the route. Police say they’re unsure how many people to expect, but appear to be taking the prospect in stride.“Obviously we expect them to obey traffic laws and not run out into the middle of the street,” said Grace Gatpandan, public information officer for the San Francisco police department.Another 3,500 people clicked a Facebook button to attend a similar event in Brooklyn on July 23, while 1,200 said they’d turn out the same night in St. Petersburg, Florida.DRATINI, PLEASE, VERY DRYIn the week since the game’s release, “Pokemon Go” fans have flocked to parks, piers and other public spots in search of creatures with names like Pikachu, Dratini and Jigglypuff. One small park in Sydney, Australia has drawn crowds of 1,000 or more players — sparking complaints from nearby residents about noise and trash, according to news reportsWitsch said she’s been surprised by the response to her announcement in San Francisco, since she expected “maybe 50 people.” She’s still contacting bars to let them know about the event.The response hasn’t surprised Karen North, a psychologist and University of Southern California professor who studies social media.“People are social animals, and they’re always looking for something new and exciting to do,” North said. “This is much more fun than just going to a pub crawl, because it gives everybody a common activity and something to talk about.”GETTING JIGGLYPUFF WITH ITAbout 1,700 people have RSVP’d on Facebook for a July 23 Pokemon pub crawl in Sacramento. Despite reports that players have been injured and others robbed after becoming distracted by the game, City Councilman Steve Hansen said he’s hoping for a positive vibe during the crawl, which two of his constituents are organizing.“There’s been this real anxiety around the country in the last couple of weeks. I think we need things that bring the community together,” Hansen said, referring to recent racial and political tensions. He said the event offers the promise of “a little bit of harmless fun, especially if you make sure you don’t walk into the street while chasing Pokemon.”New Yorker Justin Carlino voiced a simpler goal.“Most kids who grew up with Pokemon are people our age now,” said Carlino, 24, who decided to organize a Brooklyn event with his friend, Michael Ackermann, 26, after a recent night spent imbibing and playing the game. “They love Pokemon and they love drinking, so this is a perfect combination of both.” read more

NMA Releases second CORESafety interactive toolbox for safer mines

first_imgThe National Mining Association (NMA) recently released its second interactive toolbox to help member and non-member companies implement the CORESafety initiative at their facilities. CORESafety is a scalable safety and health management system that provides a comprehensive pathway to achieve within five years mining’s goal of eliminating fatalities and reducing the rate of mining injuries by 50%.The NMA states that the management system toolbox will educate and assist company personnel on the development, implementation and operation of a safety and health management system (SHMS). The CORES afety SHMS ties many safety variables into a common structure, helping mining companies achieve continuous and sustained safety excellence. “We hope companies find these tools useful and practical for integrating CORESafety into their safety and health management practices, and we welcome feedback on their experience with the latest iteration of our state-of-the-art safety and health initiative,” said NMA President and CEO Hal Quinn. The first CORESafety Toolbox, the Culture Enhancement Toolbox, was released last fall. Both resources can be found at www.coresafety.orglast_img read more

Joint liquidators appointed to Treasury Holdings

first_imgTHE HIGH COURT has today appointed joint liquidators to take control of the assets of Treasury Holdings with immediate effect.Sixteen subsidiary companies were also included in the ruling, made by Mr Justice McGovern.The joint liquidators have been named as Michael McAteer and Paul McCann of Grant Thornton.Previous receivers which had already been appointed to manage certain assets will remain in situ.The newly appointed-liquidators will deal with the remaining assets and creditors.Read: High Court rejects Treasury challenge against NAMA over receivers >last_img read more

18 signs youre a sports fan from Meath

first_img16. And it’s not really a Meath match in Croker unless he is sitting up with the LMFM commentary teamCredit: INPHO/James Crombie15. You’re certain Xabi Alonso learned how to do comebacks from the summer he spent learning English in Kells in 1997, when Meath had the three-in-a-row against KildareCredit: ybig.ie14. Your betting is decided solely on which horse Pelletstown’s finest Barry Geraghty is onCredit: INPHO/Lorraine O’Sullivan13. And Fairyhouse is the place to be come the Easter weekend… whatever the weatherCredit: INPHO/Morgan Treacy12. You’re fashion forward – like Trevor GilesCredit: INPHO/Tom Honan 17. You know Shaggy only caught Ronan O’Gara’s cross-field kick because of his time with Duleek/Bellewstown GFC Credit: INPHO/Cathal Noonan5. You don’t need reminding that, although Niall Ronan wears the red of Munster these days, he’s a Royal through and throughCredit:4. You remember when Graham Geraghty had trials with Arsenal as well as when he togged out for Bohs and Drogheda UnitedCredit: INPHO3. You know September 20, 1987 as the day the Royals ended a 20-year wait to lift Sam againCredit: INPHO/Billy Stickland2. You celebrate winning in the same way as Peter Casey1. Your all-time favourite goal is Kevin Foley’s in the third 1991 Leinster Football final replayYouTube credit: MeathClips21 signs you’re a sports fan from Tipperary20 signs you’re a sports fan from Dublin 18. You’ve had a snack box from Ezio’s outside Pairc Tailteann after a league matchCredit:  Google Maps 8. In your opinion, Timmy Clancy would be close to international cap… if only his groin would stop acting upCredit: Alan Peebles/PA Archive/Press Association Images7. It saddens you to think that Sean Boylan’s last hurrah was a facile 2-point loss to Cavan in ClonesCredit: INPHO/Patrick Bolger 6. And you privately wish that Sean Boylan would take over the hurling team 11. Giles might have been great at frees, but he was no Brian StaffordCredit: INPHO10. You went to watch Europe win the Solheim Cup at Killeen Castle in 2011Suzann Pettersen (right) celebrates with team captain Alison Nicholas. Credit: Julien Behal/PA Archive/Press Association Images9. You like to remind Louth fans about that Joe Sheridan goalYouTube credit: KilkennyFootballlast_img read more

Laccès aux soins des plus démunis continue de se dégrader selon Médecins

first_imgL’accès aux soins des plus démunis continue de se dégrader, selon Médecins du mondeDans son rapport 2010/2011, l’organisation Médecins du monde met en évidence l’accès de plus en plus difficile des plus démunis aux soins. Elle s’inquiète également du retard mis par un nombre grandissant de patients à se faire soigner. C’est un bilan plutôt inquiétant que Médecins du monde (MdM) dresse dans son rapport annuel dévoilé jeudi lors d’une conférence de presse. D’après ce dernier, les plus démunis accèderaient de plus en plus difficilement aux soins en raison de politiques publiques “plus sécuritaires que sociales”. A quelques jours de la journée mondiale de la Misère le 17 octobre, Médecins du Monde a ainsi révélé que les 21 centres de soin de l’organisation ont enregistré entre 2008 et 2010 pas moins de 38.606 consultations, soit une augmentation de 10%. En 2010, près de 12% des patients reçus étaient des mineurs, dont la moitié avait moins de 7 ans et un tiers seulement était suivi par les services de protection maternelle et infantile. En outre, 8% des femmes enceintes suivies par l’ONG vivent à la rue et plus de la moitié présentent un retard de suivi de grossesse. Le docteur Olivier Bernard, président de Médecins du Monde, a ainsi déploré : “Il y a un décrochage très net sur le plan sanitaire. Jusqu’à présent, nos filets de protection sociale en France faisaient que quelque soit leur situation économique et administrative, les enfants et les femmes enceintes étaient pris en charge par les dispositifs, sur le plan sanitaire et social”. Mais ce n’est pas tout puisque l’ONG s’est également préoccupée d’un second phénomène : la tendance chez de nombreux patients à tarder de se soigner. D’après les chiffres révélés, un quart des patients (24%) est en effet venu se soigner trop tardivement et 45% des consultations nécessiteraient un suivi d’au moins six mois, notamment pour des cas de diabète, asthme, hypertension artérielle, troubles psychiques, etc. “Ces retards aux soins sont préjudiciables au niveau individuel en raison des complications possibles pour le malade, à l’échelle collective en cas de maladies infectieuses, et au niveau économique car le coût pour la société est bien supérieur”, a indiqué le Dr Bernard. Une couverture vaccinale de 30% À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?”Ils retardent leurs soins parce que c’est compliqué d’ouvrir des droits quand on ne parle pas la langue”, a commenté Jean-François Corty, directeur des Missions France, précisant que 95% des personnes accueillies par MdM sont étrangères. “Ces populations, qui vivent pour la quasi-totalité sous le seuil de pauvreté, ne peuvent payer le ticket d’entrée de 30 euros”, obligatoire depuis 2010 pour bénéficier de l’Aide médicale d’Etat, destinée aux étrangers en situation irrégulière. Enfin, “se déplacer entre le lieu de vie et le lieu de consultation, c’est prendre des risques de s’exposer à des arrestations”, a t-il ajouté. Au vu de ces difficultés, la couverture vaccinale de ces populations est “d’environ 30%, contre 90 à 95% pour la population générale”, et “on voit apparaître la résurgence d’épidémies d’une autre époque”, a encore souligné M. Corty, citant la rougeole, la tuberculose, la gale ou l’hépatite A.Pour y faire face, MdM à mis en place des dispositifs normalement utilisés “en zone de conflit ou après une catastrophe naturelle”, comme des campagnes de vaccination de masse, des camps de déplacés, etc. “On est en train de basculer vers des interventions de nature humanitaire”, a déploré M. Corty cité par l’AFP. Lors de la conférence de presse, Olivier Bernard a ainsi interpellé les candidats à la présidentielle “pour qu’ils prennent position” en faveur de la “défense d’un “système de santé solidaire”.Le 14 octobre 2011 à 17:19 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Miami Beach Fire hosts child car seat inspection

first_imgThanks for stopping by the @MiamiBeachFire car seat checkup @wsvn. 👍🏻🚒 pic.twitter.com/y8sU11ucFs— City of Miami Beach (@MiamiBeachNews) June 21, 2016Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. MIAMI BEACH, FLA. (WSVN) – The Miami Beach Fire Department invited parents to have their child car seats inspected by trained firefighters, Tuesday.The group corrected mistakes and answered questions aiming to keep kids safe. “One out of every four child [deaths] is a fatality in a car accident,” said Miami Beach Fire Capt. Charlton Price. “To help prevent that, we started this program, and we want to help the public and help their children get and remain safe.”According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, nearly one of every four car seats are improperly installed.last_img read more

ADFG shuts down Little Su kings for the season

first_imgDays after lifting restrictions on one river in the Susitna drainage, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game is shutting down king salmon fishing entirely on another.  On Wednesday, a Fish and Game emergency order states that, starting at 12:01 am on Friday, the Little Susitna River south of the Parks Highway bridge will be completely closed for kings.Download AudioAccording to Fish and Game, only nineteen king salmon have passed the counting weir, and about 200 kings have been harvested.  Fish and Game says that low water levels are causing the fish to stay further downriver, which makes them more vulnerable to being caught.  The low end of the escapement goal for the Little Su is 900 kings.A complete list of fishing restrictions can be found on the Alaska Department of Fish and Game website.last_img read more

Got quake damage Officials outline next steps for claims

first_imgCracks in a ramp by Minnesota and International (Photo: Nathanial Herz – Alaska Public Media, Anchorage)As residents in Southcentral Alaska clean up damage from last week’s earthquake, government officials have one major request: take notes.That was one key message at a special Assembly meeting Wednesday addressing how individuals should be submitting claims to state and federal officials in the weeks ahead.Recouping losses to homes and property in the wake of a disaster involves multiple steps with insurance companies, as well as state and federal relief agencies. For the time being, Mike Sutton with Alaska’s Division of Homeland Security told Assembly members and the public that the state is trying to gather damage assessments from residents.“The individual assistance program, in our estimation, is the most important,” Sutton said. “Taking care of people, making sure people who don’t have a home that’s livable have options. And we begin to implement our programs and lend assistance to them.”The state wants people with damage to their homes and what’s deemed “essential personal property” to call a hotline or file claims online. That includes descriptions of the damage, the address affected, as well as insurance and personal information. Evidence, like before and after photos of impacted areas, is helpful. As the state of Alaska begins getting a picture of damage at the residential level it will give an aggregated assessment to the governor, who will then pass it on to federal officials with FEMA.The state has already received 1,800 applications for relief.But between now and January 29th, a major aim is getting resources to people who have been driven from their homes.“Our priority is to work with applications that we see for folks that have houses, homes, primary residences that are severely damaged and unlivable in their opinion,” said Sam Walton with the state’s Disaster Assistance Program. “Folks that just had things broken, those applications are in the system and we’ll get to those as we can.”It’s not clear yet how many people in Anchorage or the Valley have homes the earthquake rendered unlivable. But one of them is Ayyu Qassataq, who’s lived in her west Anchorage house for more than a decade.“My home is leaning outward and buckled in the middle,” Qassataq said after testifying to the Assembly during Wednesday’s meeting. “In the case of another major event, it’s very possible that my home would crumple.”That determination was made by building inspectors, who told Qassataq it was unsafe for her to stay there. She packed a bag, gathered important items, and is now sorting out how to file her claims through insurance and government programs. She said it was helpful to hear from state and federal relief agencies in the Assembly’s forum, but knows it’s only the beginning of a long process.Residents are encouraged to submit their individual assistance claims online here. Or call 1-855-445-7131.last_img read more

Gear up for civic body polls Mopidevi Venkata Ramana

first_imgVisakhapatnam: Minister for Animal Husbandry, Marketing and Fisheries Mopidevi Venkata Ramana has appealed to party cadre to get ready to hoist the YSRCP flag in all the wards of the GVMC in the ensuing municipal elections. At a meeting held here on Sunday with the party workers and supporters, he attended as chief guest and spoke on the importance of retaining Visakhapatnam in the forthcoming elections. Terming Visakhapatnam as one of the greatest cities in the country, he said it has all the qualifications to become a mega city. Also Read – Goldsmith steals gold by polishing jewelry in Bhimavaram Advertise With Us However, he pointed out that the previous TDP government had misused crores of rupees in the name of partnership summits and failed to get new projects to the city. “Our aim is to bring back the past glory of the city enjoyed during former chief minister Y S Rajasekhara Reddy government,” the minister said. He urged the party workers to work in all the corporation divisions which should be retained by the YSRCP and for this to become reality, he added, every worker should don the role of a soldier. Also Read – Permission mandatory for Ganesh pandals: SP Advertise With Us He accused TDP government of looting the State in the name of building the capital city and resorting to corrupt practices beyond imagination. He said the party would recognise the contributions made by the workers and would be rewarded suitably at appropriate time. The State government would consider its manifesto as Bhagavad Gita and strive to achieve all the promises made during elections for the benefit of people, the minister assured. Further, he said the party leaders should ensure the victory of all the corporators to silence the TDP which had been crying foul about poll machination by the YSRCP. The meeting was attended by Tourism Minister Muttamsetti Srinivasa Rao, party leader Dronamraju Srinivas and MP MVV Satyanarayana, among others.last_img read more

DC Musicians Recreate Motown Era

first_imgThe Brencore Allstars perform Motown hits from the 1960s and ‘70s. (Courtesy Photo)The Publick Playhouse, in Cheverly, Maryland, served as a time travelling machine on the night of Sept. 26, as it took audiences back to the 1960s and 70s, with Motown hits played during the Tribute to the Music of Motown by the Brencore Allstars.The Brencore Allstars are a local 12-piece band from the Washington, D.C. area.“I personally think this is the best Motown revue on the east coast,” Robert Smoot, CEO of Brencore Entertainment and producer of the show, said. He said he compared the show’s quality to Motown the Musical on Broadway.Six singers, in the show, did a compilation of full songs of classic Motown artists, and a host of medleys, from singers such as Smokey Robinson, The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, The Temptations, The Supremes, and The Jackson 5.Not only did they sing, Motown hits, but the show also paid homage to Aretha Franklin, who is known as the queen of soul.The performances were interactive as they encouraged audience members to get out their seats and dance. Smoot said the show’s interactive nature was what made it different from other Motown revue performances.“Come on miss lady with those cute earrings I like,” sang Lakesha Ameya Taylor, directly to an audience member who was flattered and danced even harder.Linda Lewis, an audience member who came to the show as a birthday gift to her 97-year-old husband, Harvey Lewis, thoroughly enjoyed the show. “I think it’s important because it made you move,” she said.In total, there were 28 songs performed by the band.Brencore Allstars will perform a Tribute to the Music of Motown next at the Howard Theatre on Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m.last_img read more

Dance that connects inner spirit with soil

first_imgGet ready to witness a spectacular dance and theatre show inspired by Kalaripayattu – the oldest martial art in the world. The extravaganza titled ‘Bhu’ is being organised by Alliance française de Delhi on May 13 at ML Bhartia Auditorium. The performance showcases journey of a man who discovers his deep union with Mother Earth (Bhu). Beyond a story, this show invites the audience to an itinerary, accessible to everyone. India has a deep and ancient tradition of connecting with the Bhuthas (Five Elements): earth, water, fire, air and ether. Through connecting with them, humans can reconnect with the origin and cradle of consciousness that is the source of all matter. In this show, the idea is to invoke the spirit of the BHU element (earth). The Kalari warrior carries, in his body, the memory of the earth. Through this process, one is able to reconnect to the pure origin that keeps him in motion with the heartbeat of the earth. A dialogue is created between the earth and the body of the performers, music and the audience. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfLed by Philippe Pelen Baldini and Thierry Moucazambo, and guided by the master of Kalaripayattu Guru Lakshman Gurukkal, Bhu is an experimental play that uses both modern theatrical, choreographic tools and the traditional form of kalaripayattu to create an organic dance. The performers are Kalaripayattu warriors/dancers/ healers/masters in energy. With them, one can experience the origin of movement and theatrical act. The experience of the body “becoming all eyes” as they used to say in Kalaripayattu wisdom is incredible. This happens when all the body is fully connected with his environment and nature. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveArtists who will be performing includes, Nikhil Varagiri (Indian) Kalari artist and dancer, Thierry Moucazambo (French, Auroville) dancer, singer and actor; Prakash (Indian) musician, kalari artist and dancer; Swaroop Kannan (Indian), kalari artist and dancer; Madhu Jayamurthy (Indian, Auroville), musician, kalari artist,and dancer; Aurelio C. Hammer (Austria, Auroville), sound and music advisor; Suresh Kaliyath, musician, kalari artist and Jean Legrand, light designer.last_img read more

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first_imgTechnology | February 11, 2009 Anthro’s New Workstation Supports PACS Needs News | Enterprise Imaging | April 05, 2019 Visage 7 Enterprise Imaging Platform Highlighted at 2019 SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium Visage Imaging will be exhibiting the latest version of the Visage 7 Enterprise Imaging Platform at the 2019 Society of… read more February 12, 2009 – Anthro Corp., Technology Furniture, introduced a new member to the Elevate Electric Lift Family, Elevate Adjusta designed for medical imaging applications (PACS).The Elevate Adjusta supports up to five monitors and features quiet and easy height adjustment. The Elevate Adjusta has dual work surfaces, one which adjusts electronically and one which adjusts manually. The main surface will hold two PACS flat panel monitors and one system monitor or five standard monitors. The back monitor surface electrically raises and lowers with the push of a button, from as low as 27” up to 53” high, allowing the user to work comfortably, sitting or standing. The back monitor surface measures 60-in by 22-in by 1.5-in. The front keyboard surface manually adjusts up and down from 6.75-in above to 5.5-in below the back surface with a spring-assisted mechanism. The ergonomic front keyboard surface tilts 9 degrees positive (toward the user) and 15 degrees negative (away from the user). The front keyboard surface measures 60-in by 13-in by 1-in. The Elevate Adjusta supports up to five Flat Panel Monitor Arms, accessories which may be added to enhance the adjustability range. A wide variety of Flat Panel Monitor Arm solutions allow the user to bring monitors nearer for close-up viewing, adjust vertically, rotate up to 360 degrees and tilt up to 200 degrees.The Elevate Adjusta is constructed with components that are UL listed. Heavy-duty, 4-in locking rubber casters provide the Elevate Adjusta with excellent mobility. The Elevate Adjusta holds up to 150 lbs on the back monitor surface, with up to 40 lbs on the front keyboard surface and up to 100 lbs on the frame. Cables from equipment can be routed through grommets provided in the corner of the work surface, and then guided through the cable trough, which comes standard on each table. When used in PACS applications, transformers for the PACs monitors fit perfectly inside the cable trough so they are hidden and out of the way. The Elevate Adjusta table surface is made of 45-lb industrial-grade particle board with high-pressure, scratch-resistant laminate. Vinyl contour edge banding matches the laminate, available in Black or Light Grey. Metal components are composed of heavy 16-gauge steel with a baked-on powder-coat finish, available in Black or Silver Metallic. The Elevate Adjusta comes with a Lifetime Warranty on the work surface and a one-year warranty on the electrical system.Optional accessories include solutions for further ergonomic benefits (Flat Panel Monitor Arms to support standard or PACS monitors), storage (CPU Holders and equipment shelves on the base tubes for UPS storage), and power and cable management (Power Bars and Surge Protectors).For more information: www.anthro.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | PACS Accessories | May 28, 2019 Intelerad Showcases Clario SmartWorklist at SIIM 2019 The Clario SmartWorklist intelligently manages picture archiving and communication system (PACS) reading workflow by… read more Related Content News | PACS Accessories | June 13, 2019 M*Modal and Community Health Network Partner on AI-powered Clinical Documentation M*Modal announced that the company and Community Health Network (CHNw) are collaborating to transform the patient-… read more News | Teleradiology | April 10, 2019 vRad Receives 19th Patent vRad (Virtual Radiologic), a Mednax Radiology Solutions practice, announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office… read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Technology | Artificial Intelligence | May 13, 2019 FDA Approves Zebra Medical Vision’s HealthPNX AI Chest X-ray Triage Product Zebra Medical Vision has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for HealthPNX, an artificial… read more News | PACS | June 07, 2019 PaxeraHealth Wins Four New PACS Projects in Chile Picture archiving and communication system/radiology information system (PACS/RIS) developer PaxeraHealth has won four… read more News | PACS | May 22, 2019 Brazil’s Santa Casa Hospital System Chooses Carestream for Unified Diagnostic Workflow Santa Casa de Misericordia has selected Carestream to replace its legacy diagnostic workflow technology across all… read more News | Enterprise Imaging | April 15, 2019 Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Implements Change Healthcare Enterprise Imaging Change Healthcare successfully implemented its Radiology PACS (picture archiving and communication system), Image… read more News | Breast Imaging | April 03, 2019 Konica Minolta Highlights New Exa Mammo Features at SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will highlight new features of Exa Mammo, a picture archiving and communication… read morelast_img read more

VIDEO Telemedicine in the Third World

first_imgVideos | Teleradiology | March 22, 2011 VIDEO: Telemedicine in the Third World Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Recent Videos View all 606 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. “Most people have no idea what a tremendous impact radiology and telemedicine have on poor and remote regions of the world,” said Rebecca Cornelius, M.D., professor of radiology, neuroradiology, department of radiology, University Hospital, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine. Cornelius was one of the physicians on the panel and video presentation “Zero Footprint Radiology and Telemedicine Build a Platform for Sustainable Care,” which Imaging Technology News (ITN) hosted at the SIIM 2010 annual meeting.The panelists described how physicians based in the United States used teleradiology and telemedicine technology to treat patients located in a remote clinic in Honduras. The panelists made the case that this technology suite is the basis for sustainable health care outreach programs in the future. ITN Editor Cristen Bolan then presented a video illustrating how physicians and technicians equipped The Roy and Melanie Sanders Frontera Medical Center in Honduras with the digital imaging and informatics infrastructure.Several providers donated the suite of imaging technology. The equipment included a telemedicine system and ultrasound probe from Global Media, the VirtualPACS Web-based picture archiving and communication system (PACS) from MedWeb, a portable digital x-ray system from MinXray and a computed radiography (CR) unit from iCRco.In this video, Dr. Juan Vasquez gives a live demonstration of how the imaging suite quickly and seamlessly operates. Vasquez started by taking an X-ray image, processing and reviewing it on the CR, and uploading the data set to the PACS in under 10 minutes. The guest of honor, Honduran Minister of Health Arturo Bendaña, himself a trained physician, easily toggled through the streamlined digital workflow. Vasquez explained how the transition from film to digital x-ray would save the clinic on significant costs incurred from developing film. Vasquez then examined a patient’s thyroid gland with the ultrasound probe connected to a laptop computer. Next, he used a high-definition telemedicine camera to capture superficial anatomical images. Finally, he uploaded the images and consulted with physicians over Global Media’s video-conferencing system. Jeffrey E. Heck, M.D., executive director and founder of Shoulder to Shoulder, explained to onlookers this was a model for delivering high-tech care, including expert specialty consultations, to some of the most remote and isolated areas of the developing world.”With the addition of this technology, poor people have access to the same set of services that any well-equipped health center in the United States has access to,” Heck said.The panelists included: – Rebecca Cornelius, M.D., professor of radiology, neuroradiology (Clin Geo), University Hospital; University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine; Department of Radiology – Phillip Silberberg, M.D., head of Shoulder-to-Shoulder Radiology, pediatric radiologist, Kosair Childrenâ??s Hospital, – Roland Talanow, M.D., Ph.D., department of radiology, The Cleveland Clinic – Hayley Holland, MPH, director of grants and projects, Shoulder-to-Shoulder – Kim Guevara, corporate philanthropy officer and director of emergency management, Medweb. For more information: www.shouldertoshoulder.org Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Radiology and Telemedicine in Honduras:Radiologists Without Borders: The Heart of RadiologyACS, Teleradiology Deliver Modern Healthcare to HondurasDigital Imaging Delivers Modern Medicine to the Developing WorldDigital Imaging Transforms a NationRadiology IT Explores New FrontiersComputed Radiography Delivers Modern Medicine to Remote RegionsRadiology Delivers Modern Medicine to Rural Honduras Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Women’s Health View all 62 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatmentlast_img read more

Every week Paige Dimakos TheSportsPaige will

first_imgEvery week, Paige Dimakos (@The_SportsPaige) will catch up with an Arizona Cardinals player and give our listeners the opportunity to submit questions to be answered on video.Submitting a question is easy. Head on over to @AZSports on Twitter and tweet as many questions as you can think of. The best ones will make the cut!This week features Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Jaron Brown (@JaronBrown13). The video game he “dominates” at might be a little surprising and he’s asked who his favorite Clemson Tiger-now Arizona Cardinal teammate is. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Comments   Share   Top Stories Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Travelers to Israel this summer can experience mor

first_imgTravelers to Israel this summer can experience more than 80 musical, dance and theatrical performances by hundreds of international artists at the Israel Festival (May 24 – June 11).With performances in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Beer Sheva and Modi’in, the Israel Festival will showcase several world-renowned dance troupes, including the National Dance Company of Spain, the Canadian Grand Ballet of Montreal and America’s Lines Ballet.The Festival will present musical performances by the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Gil Shohat, Cantus Colln, Italian pianist Maurizio Baglini, Portuguese singer Misia as well as musicians from Azerbaijan and India. Also, free jazz concerts will take place in the Jerusalem Theatre and in the downtown Mamilla Mall.“The Israel Festival is always an exhilarating time of entertainment for Israelis and travelers of all ages,” says Arie Sommer, Commissioner of Tourism, North and South America,”and adds extra excitement to the bustling streets of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.”The Festival will also feature several international acting groups, including Israeli mime artist Hanoch Rozenthe alongside the Klipa Theatre Company, Spanish acting trio Tricycle, the State Drama Theatre of Tbilisi and the Yiddishspiel Theatre. In addition, the Israeli theatric dance group Mayumana will return to the Festival stage with a performance of their new show ‘Momentum’.www.israel-festival.org.illast_img read more

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including Priyanka Chopra. The New York Times called the skeleton crews of workers and soldiers inside the plants "perhaps Japan’s last chance of preventing a broader nuclear catastrophe. Peter Stris. What about those two other peoplethe passengers who made their way aboard the plane with stolen passports? spokesperson Gary Stephenson e-mailed a statement saying the university "takes the circumstances that led to the retraction extremely seriously. Here are the movies the streaming service will serve up in 2017." convener, "He has played at this level in other seasons. these scientists say. Yes.
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