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DeForest Buckner speaks on contract situation, 49ers’ revamped defensive line

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device Defensive tackle DeForest Buckner enters his fourth season with a lot at stake both for him and the 49ers. His career-high 12 sacks and first Pro Bowl invitation last year have him poised for a lucrative contract extension.With a stronger supporting cast, Buckner, 25, is also potentially lined up for his first playoff push, as long as he doesn’t let NFC West quarterbacks Russell Wilson and Kyler Murray duck under …last_img read more

Leaping to Evolutionary Conclusions

first_img1.  Konopka et al, “Human-specific transcriptional regulation of CNS development genes by FOXP2,” Nature 462, 213-217 (12 November 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature08549.2.  Martin H. Dominguez and Pasko Rakic, “Language evolution: The importance of being human,” Nature 462, 169-170 (12 November 2009) | doi:10.1038/462169a.It’s kind of funny watching the Darwinists go ape in their news stories.  They are desperately trying to shore up support for Darwin by showing that naturalistic science can do the job from the bottom up.  This has all the hallmarks of East Germany boasting the day before the Berlin Wall fell.  In spite of his collapsing economy, Honnecker was so confident of his ideology, he was planning a new high-tech fence that didn’t need guards to mow down its citizens wishing to escape to freedom; it could do the job automatically.  Before he knew what hit him he was history.    Look how Eugenie Scott is fighting little Ray Comfort with an arsenal of resources to overwhelm his little initiative to offer a little bit of Darwin-skeptical material to college students: she’s got a new Don’t Diss Darwin campaign to scare academia into action: “Creationism is coming to a campus near you.”  The campaign website even sells “Darwin: Evolve!” posters and other silly propaganda – posters, bookmarks and flyers.    Why the paranoia?  The Darwin Stasi know that once the wall is breached there is no going back.  Do your part to tear down this wall.  Work fast: if it falls before Nov. 24, the 150th anniversary of Darwin’s Origin, wouldn’t that be one for the history books: big party for has-been falls flat.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 In classical science, researchers were reluctant to announce bold conclusions without sufficient data.  These days, it seems that science reporters are quick to announce sweeping conclusions that go far beyond the evidence – especially if they appear to support some sort of evolution.Planet magic crystal:  Where to find intelligent life?  Look for stars depleted in lithium.  That seems to be the implication of a story in the BBC News and Science Daily that extrapolated measurements of lower lithium levels from some stars known to have planets.  Maybe the aliens around those stars are using it for di-lithium crystals.  Clara Moskowitz didn’t even need the lithium.  Simple sunlike stars “May be Cosmic Road Signs to Intelligent Aliens,”  she announced on Space.com.  To her, this is all very logical: “The distinction between habitable planets and planets harboring intelligent life is based on the fact that intelligent life requires stars with lifetimes greater than the time required for intelligence to evolve,” she said.  “For example, in the case of this solar system, we could not find ourselves around a star with a lifetime less than 4.5 billion years.”  No other source for intelligent life than blind, purposeless evolution was entertained as a possibility.Cool earth:  Science Daily leapt from a Stanford study of isotope ratios in rocks said to be 3.4 billion years old that the earth was cooler a billion years earlier than thought, and therefore life must have evolved earlier than thought.  “Their findings suggest that the early ocean was much more temperate and that, as a result, life likely diversified and spread across the globe much sooner in Earth’s history than has been generally theorized.”  How one gets from isotope ratios to life was not clear.Origin of life:  An article in Science Daily is accompanied by a picture that looks like a scene from Frankenstein.  Researchers at NASA-Ames are zapping ice with ultraviolet light.  The headline announces, “NASA Reproduces A Building Block Of Life In Laboratory.”  What really happened was that they made uracil (one of the pyrimidines in RNA) under highly specialized conditions.  It’s not really news, anyway; Jonathan Sarfati on Creation.com wrote about this 10 years ago.  Nevertheless, one of the researchers fired a conclusion heard round the universe: “Since we are simulating universal astrophysical conditions, the same is likely wherever planets are formed.”  They speculated that UV light shining on ices could have formed the uracil in comets, but did not explain how the “whimpy” [sic] molecules would have survived re-entry or concentrated in significant amounts to do any good.Plant charity:  PhysOrg reported on work on the yellow jewelweed.  Experiments show that it recognizes kin from non-kin and adjusts its growth accordingly.  Conclusion: “This study demonstrates that plants are social organisms.  It shows that altruism is possible among plants and that response to both kin and strangers depend on the ecology of the plant species.”  When they find plants donating to the Red Cross, they’ll really be onto something.Missing dino link:  The BBC News announced, “Missing link dinosaur discovered.”  It’s a sauropod that the discoverers infer walked on two legs most of the time but occasionally walked on all fours.  But then the article added that it lived in the early Jurassic.  “Although structurally it’s intermediate, it lived too late to be an actual ancestor, because true sauropods already existed [then].”  Now it has to be described as an extinct “living fossil” (an oxymoron) because “the transition” (for which there is no evidence) “must have happened much earlier.”  Science Daily was only slightly more reserved, announcing Darwinly, “New Species Of Vegetarian Dinosaur Close To Common Ancestor Of Gigantic Sauropods.”Dino sweat:  Speaking of dinosaurs, PhysOrg reported on a comparative analysis of dinosaur body types.  The scientists inferred that some of them must have been warm blooded because if not it would be hard for them to function.  The headline: “Warm-blooded dinosaurs worked up a sweat.”  The article also claimed that this demonstrates that warm-bloodedness (endothermy) “evolved” earlier: “This pushes the evolution of endothermy further back into the ancient past than many researchers expected, suggesting that dinosaurs were athletic, endothermic animals throughout the Mesozoic era.”  No fossil dinosaur pole-vaulters were discovered.Bird philosophy:  Some songbirds appear to use sets of syllables in their songs.  PhysOrg jumped into a discussion of “The Link Between Birdsong And Human Language.”  Maybe there is more scholarship in those tweets than we thought.Talking genes:  Most popular science outlets were abuzz today about a paper in tomorrow’s Nature that discussed more research into the FOXP2 gene and its complex interactions with motor actions.1  The paper was reserved in its implications, as was the review by Dominguez and Rakic in the same issue,1 which said of the work by Konopka et al, “it answers many questions, but raises even more.”  You wouldn’t know that by looking at the Live Science headline, where Jeanna Bryner announced triumphantly, “Human Speech Gene Found.”  PhysOrg followed suit, saying, “Why can’t chimps speak?  Study links evolution of single gene to human capacity for language.”  New Scientist was a little more careful, saying in its headline, “Suite of chatterbox genes discovered.”  It should be noted that no gene can create language (in terms of semantics, syntax, and abstract thought).  What has been found is that mutations to the human FOXP2 gene cause serious problems with speech because the motor neurons involved in talking are affected.last_img read more

Choosing a Cost-Effective Wall System

first_img GREEN PRODUCT GUIDE Board Insulation“I built a double-stud in 1980 and have never regretted it,” Klingel writes. “New house will be the same, but thicker, and with dense-packed cellulose instead of fiberglass.”“A double stud with a plywood exterior and interior poly and ADA [the Airtight Drywall Approach] will work,” Rooks says.GBA senior editor Martin Holladay doesn’t push the double-stud option, but he does point Olofsson toward a number of GBA articles that have been written on the topic (see the “Related Articles” sidebar). Deciphering Canadian codesMalcolm Taylor writes that the British Columbia building code allows an “airtight drywall air barrier” instead of polyethylene. “Illustrated details covering all aspects of the approach can be found in the Building Envelope Guide for Houses published by the Homeowner Protection Office, which is a Provincial Government department,” he says.But to Holladay, there seems to be some confusion in the codes over the roles that air and vapor barriers play in a wall assembly. “I can’t help but shake my head at the inconsistency in the BC code,” Holladay says. “Do code officials think that polyethylene is a vapor retarder or an air barrier? If they think it is a vapor retarder, then the Airtight Drywall Approach is no substitute. To retard the flow of vapor, you need vapor-retarder paint. The airtightness of the drywall is irrelevant.“If they think it is an air barrier, I wonder whether they require airtight installation details for all installations of poly in the province? For example, do they verify that the poly seams are sealed over framing members with Tremco acoustical sealant? Do they verify that all electrical boxes are airtight boxes? If they do, bless them. However, I doubt that they do. I think it’s far more likely that the building inspectors have no idea whether the poly they insist on is supposed to be a vapor retarder or an air barrier.”Taylor says he can’t speak to how the code is enforced in the province as a whole, but at least on Vancouver Island and the lower mainland, inspectors “insist on meticulously sealed poly.”“All seams, the joint between poly and lower plate and plate and subfloor all must have generous amounts of acoustic sealant,” he says. “Gasketed electrical boxes are also required.”In Ontario, adds Lucas Durand, there’s apparently a little more flexibility. “For the house that I am building for myself,” he says, “I have gone with taped 1/2-in. plywood for both air barrier and vapor retarder (and racking resistance). There was some initial skepticism from my inspector but it didn’t take that long to convince her — I am lucky she has been open-minded.” Creating sensible regulationsSome of the material in the Canadian publication gives Holladay reason to wonder whether government officials really understand the science behind code requirements. “As is often the case,” he writes, “this is an example of government bureaucrats enforcing regulations that are based on an incomplete understanding of the relevant scientific principles.”While that could very well be true, Olofsson’s potential tussle with local officials could have an upside. “The nice thing about your questions is that it is exposing that you can move the envelope quality in your area forward,” Rooks says. “The code seems to allow enough room for well planned modification. Lucas points out a few more methods towards improved assemblies. They are all great when executed correctly.“There is no shortcut to a ‘quality envelope.’ Plan on it being more cost and work. I think it’s the only sensible thing to do.” Erik Olofsson is planning a small house in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. Ideally, he’d like to get the walls close to R-40. The question is how.“Seeing that the received opinion around GBA is the tandem of polyethylene sheeting and exterior rigid foam is not ideal, what do the builders on this site recommend?” he asks in a post at the GBA Q&A forum. “Larsen trusses seem fairly labor-intensive and rigid foam is expensive … Is a double-stud wall the answer?”A complication is a local building code that apparently calls for a polyethylene vapor barrier on the warm side of the insulation. Although once a common building technique, it’s no longer universally accepted by building scientists as the best practice in all climates. Many builders have abandoned the use of interior polyethylene, even as some building inspectors continue to insist on it.Olofsson’s quest for high performance at a reasonable cost, while solving the riddle of air and vapor barriers, is the topic of this month’s Q&A Spotlight. Our expert’s opinionHere’s how GBA technical director Peter Yost sees it:The reason Martin Holladay and I nearly always agree on building science questions is that we both have studied under/worked with some of the best: Joe Lstiburek, John Straube, Terry Brennan, Bill Rose, Anton TenWolde.And one of the reasons there is still such confusion on basic heat transfer and moisture flow is that too many building inspectors and code officials have not.Is this silly or what?The highest priority in moisture management is bulk water: how many building inspectors check the connections between the water-resistive barrier and flashings at penetrations for continuity?The next highest priority in moisture management is capillary water: how many building inspectors check for capillary breaks between porous building components?The next priority is air-transported moisture: how many building inspectors require qualitative and quantitative information from blower-door tests?But by gosh, almost every building inspector insists on and inspects the “warm-in-winter-side” vapor retarder, by far the least important wetting mechanism in nearly all buildings and climates.And we should not be worried about the vapor permeability of just that one dedicated layer in terms of wetting, but the vapor permeability of ALL layers in terms of drying. (For more information, see my Vapor Profile blog.)GBA has a series of great resources on vapor retarders and air barriers and their differences. Use your GBA project folders, make one for your building inspector(s), and fill it up with building science reading for them! RELATED ARTICLES center_img Double-stud walls a good optionDouble-stud walls are designed to provide lots of exterior wall volume for insulation while sharply reducing thermal bridging. John Klingel and Albert Rooks are among those who think that building double-stud walls is a good approach. RELATED MULTIMEDIA Or consider 2×6 framingRooks also offers an alternative for Olofsson to consider. “Another good quality wall is a 2×6 standard frame with taped plywood or OSB exterior + WRB [water-resistant barrier] + 4 in. to 6 in. of high-density mineral wool,” he says. “It will eliminate cold sheathing and rim-joist bridging while allowing the use of a service cavity in the stud bays.”A key detail of all of these recommendations is that a polyethylene vapor barrier isn’t necessary. In the case of the wall assembly suggested by Rooks, the OSB or plywood sheathing becomes the “air/vapor control layer.”“Use a rainscreen detail, good air sealing, and ventilation,” Rooks adds. “I’m a fan of mineral wool because it doesn’t settle, doesn’t rot even if continually wetted, is fireproof, won’t support mold or bugs. It’s like a little piece if the Canadian Rockies (since it’s made of Canadian Basalt) covering your house, and near as durable.”Holladay, too, think there are alternatives to the polyethylene required by local codes. “You might want to negotiate with your local building inspector,” he says. “Many inspectors will accept MemBrain or vapor-retarder paint as an alternative to interior poly.” Podcast:Air Barriers vs. Vapor Barriers Double-stud wallsChoosing a High-Performance Wall AssemblyChoosing the Right Wall Assembly (2013)Choosing the Right Wall Assembly (2015) Is Double Stud-Wall Construction the Path to Efficiency on a Budget?Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks! Q&A: Airtight Sheathing and Thermally Isolated Double-Stud WallsSix Proven Ways to Build Energy-Smart Wallslast_img read more

Rangetopping Porsche Taycans overboost function will push power past 700 hp

first_img Now playing: Watch this: More From Roadshow 42 Photos Porsche 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss 19 Photos 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 0 Enlarge ImageFor a few moments, the Taycan will put down over 700 horsepower. Yowza.By this time next week, we’ll finally have seen Porsche’s long-awaited Taycan electric sedan. Ahead of time, there are new details still spilling out about the electric car, and this tidbit is one for the power-hungry driver.Per a drive preview from Autocar, the range-topping Porsche Taycan supposedly sports an overboost function that will help the car produce over 700 horsepower for a period of time. That’s Dodge Challenger Hellcat territory, minus any engine emissions. Reportedly, this range-topping car will be split into Taycan Turbo and Taycan Turbo S designations — a goofy nomenclature considering there are no turbos onboard, but I digress.The overboost function activates for 2.5 seconds to unlock 700-plus horsepower and supposedly helps send the electric car from 0 to 60 mph in under 3 seconds. Porsche has long been keen to point out the Taycan will absolutely house the company’s spirit and performance, and so far, the German marque appears to be delivering.It’s likely the overboost function played a key part in the car’s 7:42 Nurburgring Nordschleife run. While the lap time didn’t set any overall lap records, it is the fastest four-door electric car around the 12.8-mile circuit. Porsche also showcased the fact its upcoming electric sedan can go from 0 to 124 mph and back in just 10 seconds — multiple times in a testament to the battery-electric powertrain’s grunt.Without the overboost, we’re likely looking at around 600 hp for the range-topping Taycan along with a 300-mile range. Expect other models to fill the lineup with less performance and shorter ranges. We’ll have the full details when Porsche is ready to show the car off in September. Tags Porsche Taycan on ice in Sweden 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Post a comment Now playing: Watch this: Electric Cars Performance Cars 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss Share your voice 1:29 Ice drifting in Porsche’s all-electric Taycan More From Roadshow Share your voice Goodyear Oxygene is a living, connected tire 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Electric Cars Auto Tech 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Porsche,Sono calls the moss-filled dash BreSono and uses it to filter incoming air. Sono Typically, if you had moss in the interior of your car, that would be considered a bad thing. That’s not necessarily the case for this small, solar-powered electric vehicle from German startup Sono.The Sono Sion uses the moss, which is covered with a transparent panel, thankfully, and according to a report Thursday by Electrek, it’s part of the Sion’s cabin air filtering system. Unlike the moss inside Goodyear’s Oxygene tire concept, this moss has kicked the proverbial bucket, but because of its structure, it’s still a good filter.The Sion was conceived as a low-cost EV and debuted back in March with a 35 kilowatt-hour battery and a body covered in solar panels, but this is the first we’re seeing of its interior. The rest of the passenger cabin is pretty sparse, with a small digital instrument binnacle in front of the driver and a Tesla Model 3-like central screen sprouting from the dash.sono-motors-sion-side-profile-frontEnlarge ImageIn addition to the mossy dash, the Sono Sion is slathered in solar panels to help keep its 35 kWh battery topped up. Sono The Sion was initially marketed for the low, low price of $18,000 but — and this might be a little shocking (pun intended) — the battery pack costs extra. That is estimated to cost an additional $10,500 if bought outright, or there would be a monthly fee. I know that sounds weird, but it’s not unheard of in Europe — the Renault Zoe is sold this way.It’s unlikely that we’ll ever see the Sono Sion on our roads here in the US, but the company says it should enter production for Europe sometime in the latter half of 2020. Goodyear’s Oxygene tire is actually alive 0 Tags 5:27 Post a commentlast_img read more

Muhurat trading Samvat 2072 begins on a positive note Axis Bank biggest

first_imgSamvat 20704 Nov, 2013Sensex gains 43 points, closes at 21,239 points; Nifty gains 10 points, closes at 6317Gainers – Tata Motors, Sun Pharma, Maruti Suzuki Samvat 2072 began on a positive note on the stock exchanges on Wednesday, with the S&P Sensex opening 191 points higher from its previous close of Tuesday, belying concerns that the Bihar Assembly poll results will subdue investor sentiments.The S&P BSE Sensex later trimmed gains to close at 25,866.95, up 123.69 points, or 0.48%. Some of the Sensex gainers included Axis Bank, Sun Pharma, Tata Steel, Bhel and L&T, while the scrips that closed lower included Hero Motocorp, Bharti Airtel and ITC.Axis Bank was the biggest gainer, closing 2.50% higher at Rs 480.20, followed by Sun Pharma that closed 1.93% higher at Rs 746.55.Infosys, recommended by many brokerages, saw a modest gain of 0.25% to close at Rs 1,109.15 on the BSE. The 50-scrip NSE Nifty also opened high at 7,838.80, but after paring the initial gains, closed at 7,825,  a gain of 41.65 points, or 0.54%. The Nifty saw 43 advances and 7 declines, with Axis Bank, Yes Bank, BPCL and Sun Pharma posting decent gains, while Grasim, ITC and Bharti Airtel declined.Among the BSE sectoral indices, almost all of them ended in the green, the maximum gain being registered by BSE Realty Index, at 2.16%. The special trading session was held between 5.45 pm and 6.45 pm, heralding Samvat 2072.In Samvat 2071, during the special trading session on 23 October 2014, the S&P BSE Sensex gained 63 points to close at 26,851; the rally was led by ONGC, Reliance Industries and L&T.The Nifty had gained 18.65 points to close at 8014.55.Muhurat trading over the last five years:YearYearDateDateTrend/ResultTrend/ResultGainers/LosersGainers/LosersYearSamvat 2072Date11 Nov, 2015Trend/ResultSensex gains 123.69 points, closes at 25,866; Nifty up 41 points, closes at 7,825Gainers/LosersGainers – Axis Bank, Sun Pharma, Tata STeelYearSamvat 2071Date23 Oct, 2014Trend/ResultSensex gains 63 points, closes at 26,851; Nifty gains 18 points, closes at 8014Gainers/LosersGainers – ONGC, RIL, :&TYearSamvat 2070Date4 Nov, 2013Trend/ResultSensex gains 43 points, closes at 21,239 points; Nifty gains 10 points, closes at 6317Gainers/LosersGainers – Tata Motors, Sun Pharma, Maruti SuzukiYearSamvat 2069Date13 Nov, 2012Trend/ResultSensex loses 51 points, closes at 18,618.87; Nifty sheds 16 points, closes at 5,666Gainers/LosersLosers – Tata Motors, HDFC, Infosys, SBIYearSamvat 2068Date26 Oct, 2011Trend/ResultSensex gains 34 points, closes at 17,288; Nifty up, closes at 5201Gainers/LosersGainers – L&T, SBI, HDFC Bank, Bajaj Auto YearDateTrend/ResultGainers/Losers Samvat 207123 Oct, 2014Sensex gains 63 points, closes at 26,851; Nifty gains 18 points, closes at 8014Gainers – ONGC, RIL, :&T Samvat 206826 Oct, 2011Sensex gains 34 points, closes at 17,288; Nifty up, closes at 5201Gainers – L&T, SBI, HDFC Bank, Bajaj Auto Samvat 206913 Nov, 2012Sensex loses 51 points, closes at 18,618.87; Nifty sheds 16 points, closes at 5,666Losers – Tata Motors, HDFC, Infosys, SBI Samvat 207211 Nov, 2015Sensex gains 123.69 points, closes at 25,866; Nifty up 41 points, closes at 7,825Gainers – Axis Bank, Sun Pharma, Tata STeellast_img read more

JFrog acquires DevOps startup Shippable for an endtoend DevOps solution

first_imgJFrog, a leading company in DevOps has acquired Shippable– a cloud-based startup that focuses on Kubernetes-ready continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD), helping developers to ship code and deliver app and microservices updates. This strategic acquisition- JFrog’s fifth-  aims at providing customers with a “complete, integrated DevOps pipeline solution”.The collaboration between JFrog and Shippable will allow users to automate their development processes right from the time the code is committed all the way to production. Shlomi Ben Haim, Co-founder, and CEO of JFrog, says in the official press release that “The modern DevOps landscape requires ever-faster delivery with more and more automation. Shippable’s outstanding hybrid and cloud native technologies will incorporate yet another best-of-breed solution into the JFrog platform. Coupled with our commitments to universality and freedom of choice, developers can expect a superior out-of-the-box DevOps platform with the greatest flexibility to meet their DevOps needs.”According to an email sent to Packt Hub, JFrog, will now allow developers to have a completely integrated DevOps pipeline with JFrog, while still retaining the full freedom to choose their own solutions in JFrog’s universal DevOps model. The plan is to release the first technology integrations with JFrog Enterprise+ this coming summer, and a full integration by Q3 of this year. According to JFrog, this acquisition will result in a more automated, complete, open and secure DevOps solution in the market. This is just another victory for JFrog. JFrog has previously announced a $165 million Series D funding. Last year, the company also launched JFrog Xray, a binary analysis tool that performs recursive security scans and dependency analyses on all standard software package and container types. Avi Cavale, founder and CEO of Shippable, says that Shippable users and customers will now “have access to leading security, binary management and other high-powered enterprise tools in the end-to-end JFrog Platform”, and that the combined forces of JFrog and Shippable can make full DevOps automation from code to production a reality. Read Next Spotify acquires Gimlet and Anchor to expand its podcast servicesMicrosoft acquires Citus Data with plans to create a ‘Best Postgres Experience’Adobe Acquires Allegorithmic, a popular 3D editing and authoring companylast_img read more