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Mourinho signs contract extension at Manchester United

first_imgUnited are a distant second in the Premier League to Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City this season but are still in the FA Cup and the Champions League.“I am really honoured and proud to be Manchester United manager,” Mourinho, 54, said in a club statement. “I would like to say a big thank you to the owners and to (executive vice-chairman) Mr (Ed) Woodward for the recognition of my hard work and dedication. I am delighted they feel and trust that I am the right manager for this great club for the foreseeable future.“We have set very high standards — winning three trophies in one season (including the Community Shield) — but those are the standards I expect my teams to aim for. We are creating the conditions for a brilliant and successful future for Manchester United.” Mourinho, who was appointed in May 2016 on a three-year deal, replaced Louis van Gaal with a brief to return the club to the pinnacle of the English game.The 20-time league champions have not won the Premier League title since Alex Ferguson’s last season in charge in 2012-13. – Workrate –Woodward said the former Chelsea and Real Madrid boss, whose new deal includes an option for a further year, had already achieved a great deal in his time at Old Trafford.Manchester United’s manager Jose Mourinho kisses the trophy after the UEFA Europa League final in 2017 © AFP/File / Odd ANDERSEN“His workrate and professionalism are exceptional and he has embraced the club’s desire to promote top quality young players to the first team,” said Woodward.“He has brought an energy and a sense of purpose to everything that he does and I am sure that will continue to bring results for the fans and the club.”Earlier this month Mourinho dismissed reports he may walk out on United this coming close season as “garbage”.Mourinho had looked an unhappy figure as United’s title bid faltered and they suffered a shock League Cup exit at Championship side Bristol City.There had been suggestions that Mourinho was disappointed at the relative lack of spending power at his disposal, claims which he also denied.And Mourinho was upset at suggestions that his decision to live in a hotel, rather than finding a home in Manchester, was a sign of a lack of professionalism or commitment to the job.Earlier this week United signed Arsenal forward Alexis Sanchez in a swap deal for Henrikh Mkhitaryan to add to their well-stocked forward line featuring the likes of Romelu Lukaku, Anthony Martial, Marcus Rashford and Jesse Lingard.Sanchez, who had previously been strongly linked with a move to Manchester City, is in the squad to play Yeovil Town in the FA Cup fourth round on Friday0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Jose Mourinho, pictured in December 2017, became the first Manchester United manager in history to win a major trophy in his first season when he secured the League Cup © AFP/File / Paul ELLISLondon, United Kingdom, Jan 25 – Jose Mourinho has signed a contract extension that will keep him at Manchester United until at least 2020, the club said Thursday, ending rumours he is unhappy at Old Trafford.Mourinho became the first United manager in history to win a major trophy in his first season when he secured the League Cup last year, and he also led the club to victory in the Europa League, the only competition they had never won.last_img read more

Stem-Cell Advocates Try to Shield Ethical Concerns

first_imgWould an embryonic stem cell by another name cease being human?  Several recent articles on embryonic stem cells are going beyond just touting the potential cures from the controversial research, which involves creating and destroying a human embryo.  Some are blurring the line between embryonic and adult stem cells (cf. 12/02/2006) and attempting to avoid ethically-charged language.  Here are some ways that reporters are trying to make ES cells more palatable to the public:ES joins the army:  An article on Science Daily claims that embryonic stem cells are being recruited in the war on terror.  A University of Georgia research claims that neural cells induced to multiply from stem cells can detect toxins in the environment, like on a battlefield.  The article fails to mention, however, why embryonic stem cells are needed, and whether adult stem cells could do the job just as well (cf. 07/19/2007).  It also begins with this misleading clause that suggests that embryonic stem cells have already produced cures: “For more than a decade, Steve Stice has dedicated his research using embryonic stem cells to improving the lives of people with degenerative diseases and debilitating injuries.”  The record shows, however, that only adult stem cells have produced therapies that can improve the lives of people, while embryonic stem cells arouse fears of a new era of eugenics (12/16/2006, 11/29/2006 08/13/2006).Get over it:  The Editorial in Nature 9/27 urged Germans to get over their ethical qualms about embryonic stem cells and get with the international stem cell gold rush (cf. 12/16/2005).  Some German ethicists have pointed to the success of adult stem cells to show that embryonic stem cells are unnecessary.  In urging a change, Nature used only bandwagon arguments (cf. 07/31/2006): “The majority of scientists agree that work on both adult and embryonic sources of stem cells should run in parallel until much more is understood about their biology,” the editorial said.  “But Germany is out of step with most European countries in permitting research only on human embryonic stem-cell lines that were created before January 2002, when regulations were first laid down.”  The article admitted that the creation of new ES cell lines “involves destroying human embryos,” but urged scientists to step up their campaigns against the opponents of the controversial research – many of whom are still smarting from the bad reputation Germany inherited from human medical research atrocities of the Nazis (04/07/2005, 02/28/2006, 12/16/2006).Kahuna:  In the same issue, Nature published an interview with Alan Trounson, newly appointed head of California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) – the $3 billion stem-cell center approved by California voters.  The differences in success between adult and embryonic cells were blurred in his statement, “Mesenchymal [multipotent] stem cells are already in clinical trials.  Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are coming of age….”  His ending statement was even more telling: “Adult stem cells are happening.  Embryonic stem cells will come into use, and they won’t be immediate cures for everything.  You need drugs and protocols as well as the cells, and you’ve got to work with the immune system.”  Yet California voters had been swayed by tear-jerking stories of invalids who would be cured by embryonic stem cells.  The problems from subjects’ immune systems rejecting embryonic stem cells have so far rendered them medically useless.  On top of that, Trounson made it clear that no cures are forthcoming any time soon (cf. 10/13/2006).Loaded words:  Because the words “embryonic” and “cloning” are touchy with the public, the US Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry is changing its name to the Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Registry.  Monya Baker reported in Nature 9/27 that this was intended to downplay ethically-charged words.  Baker quoted a professor of rhetoric who called this “linguistic deflation of public anxiety.”  The center was reacting to an executive order from President Bush that stem cell lines be expanded “in ethically responsible ways.” The same issue of Nature pointed to a promising avenue of research that might solve the ethical problems.  “For practical and ethical reasons, researchers are on the lookout for ways to reprogramme one mature cell type into another,” said Huafeng Xie and Stuart H. Orkin in News and Views.  “In one case, this might be as easy as switching off a single gene.”  They highlighted research that showed it may be possible to turn one kind of cell into another kind through a process of “cellular reprogramming.”  They pointed to a paper in the same issue by Cobaleda et al who found that “mature B cells can be converted to functional T cells, and reprogramming is achieved by B cells taking a step backwards to assume a more immature state.”  If so, it might become possible to take adult cells from a person and convert them back into an embryonic state – no ethical qualms involved.  “Such insights will, in turn, make the alteration of cell fates using modulation of gene expression and the generation of a specific cell population possible, which is a primary goal of regenerative medicine.”  See also the 06/06/2007 and 08/25/2006 entries.As we have shown repeatedly before, ES stem-cell advocates are pushing their agenda past the ethical gatekeepers on selfish, pragmatic grounds, yet have no results to show for it.  The appeals are always for Nobel Prizes and staying ahead in the international sweepstakes.  Whenever an ethicist calls them on the questionable reasoning of taking one life to help another (07/11/2005), they hum and guffaw and dodge the issue.  Now they are trying to blur the language with euphemisms to pull the wool over our eyes.  Don’t let them get away with it (07/19/2007).(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Magakwe the first South African to break 10-second barrier

first_img14 April Simon Magakwe became the first South African to break the 10-second barrier for the 100 metres at the South African Athletics Championships in Pretoria on the weekend. Magakwe had the crowd on its feet when he stopped the clock in 9.99 seconds to claim his sixth national title. The time was subsequently rounded down to 9.98 seconds.‘I wanted it so badly’ “From the start I was aggressive, I just wanted it so badly. The last 30 metres I pushed so hard,” Magakwe told the South African Press Association (Sapa) afterwards. “What is exciting is my coach [Eugene Thipe] is from South Africa, and not from Jamaica. Everything we do, we do in South Africa.” Magakwe had narrowly missed the national record he shared with Johan Rossouw of 10.06 seconds in the semi-final by one-hundredth-of-a-second. With his record-setting run, he raced past the time he had shared with Rossouw, who set the national record in 1988. Second-placed Akani Simbine also bettered the previous mark, in a time of 10.02 seconds, while Emile Erasmus was third in 10.23 seconds. “The sad thing is I can’t remember a part of it [the race],” Simbine told Sapa “I am just happy that I did my best and ran my PB [personal best]. “I didn’t expect to go even that close (to breaking through 10 seconds), so I am pretty happy.”The start of big things? Olympic 200 metres finalist Anaso Jobodwana watched the race from the stands and afterwards went down to the track to congratulate Magakwe. He said he hoped Magakwe’s barrier-breaking run would lead to South African athletes repeating that effort. “I am really glad for [Magakwe] and Akani, and I am happy for the way it has turned out,” Jobodwana said. “It shows us that we have the potential and we can take it not just from the 100m, but to the 200m, and the 400m, like we’ve already been dominating the 800m.” Jobodwana, who owns a best time of 10.10 seconds for the 100m, added: “In no time we could have something like Jamaica, because we have the talent, but it is just that athletics doesn’t have the appeal right now.”National record With athletes boasting far less impressive personal best times, South Africa won the 4 by 100 metres title at the 2001 IAAF World Championships in Edmonton, Canada, in a national record of 38.47 seconds. That record still stands, but could be under threat if the country’s top national sprinters get together for a record attempt. Apart from Magakwe (9.98), Simbine (10.02) and Jobodwana (10.10), national universities champion Henricho Bruintjies ran a time of 10.17 seconds in the semi-finals, giving South Africa a foursome that could be among the world’s leading quartets.last_img read more