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Writers: We’re ready to strike

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Staff Writer Television and movie screenwriters said Thursday they will go on strike for the first time in nearly 20 years. Four writers told The Associated Press that Writers Guild of America President Patric Verrone made the announcement in a closed-door session Thursday night, prompting loud cheers from the crowd. “There was a unified feeling in the room. I don’t think anyone wants the strike, but people are behind the negotiation committee,” said writer Dave Garrett. Writers were expected to announce when the strike would begin sometime today. HOLLYWOOD: Walkout announcement is expected today. Late-night television talk shows would immediately go dark. By Julia M. Scott Still, Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers president Nick Counter released a statement indicating a strike could still be averted. “We are ready to meet and are prepared to close this contract this weekend,” he said. At issue is how writers will be paid for new media such as DVD sales and digital downloads and how writers for reality shows should be compensated. Both sides are gearing for a fight. If a strike comes, television viewers will immediately notice a difference. Late-night talk shows that feed off current events and require fresh writing will go dark immediately. Production of television dramas and comedies such as “Heroes” and “Ugly Betty” will grind to a halt, but studios that have stockpiled episodes will continue to shoot and air them. Reality shows and commercials, however, will continue uninterrupted. Writers and actors have been fighting for years to reverse what they see as a huge mistake made at the dawn of home video, when no one was sure if selling movies on VHS cassettes would ever make money. The unions agreed to ignore the first 80 percent of revenue from the tapes and later DVDs, assuming most of the money represented the cost of manufacturing and distribution. Writers settled for just 1.2 percent of the remaining 20percent, a figure that amounts to about 3 cents on a DVD that retails for $20. Writers are now asking for their share to be calculated on 40 percent of revenue and argue the same formula should be used for digital distribution because studios have almost no costs associated with that technology. Studios argue that it is too early to know how much money they can make from offering entertainment on the Internet, cell phones, iPods and other devices. The impact of a strike could be substantial. It could cost more than $1 billion in lost wages, experts said. “You could have a very localized recession,” said Jack Kyser, chief economist at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. But that’s only if the strike drags on for two or three months. David Smith, an associate dean at the Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine University, agreed. “It’s not a strong possibility right now but something to keep on the radar screen,” he said. A five-month strike like one in 1988, which cost $500million in lost wages, would easily amount to between $1billion and $2billion in lost wages now, Kyser said. A contract covering 12,000 workers expired late Wednesday night without a new deal. Members have already voted – by a 9-to-1 ratio – to let leaders call a strike if negotiations fail. In 2001, actors worked for two months without a contract, but it’s unclear whether writers will go that route. The motion picture industry is the third-largest employer in the county and a strike would reach far beyond a picket line of writers. The industry’s lucrative salaries mean that one entertainment job supports or creates 1.5 nonentertainment jobs. Businesses that feed off studio salaries, such as restaurants in Studio City and Burbank, are already hurting. At Big Screen Cuisine in Burbank, owner Scott Floman is bracing for the worst. “If they strike, it’s going to definitely take a turn into our business,” Floman said. About 70 percent of his catering sales come from feeding staffers on the set of movies and television shows. If a strike comes, Floman immediately will ask his head chef to “go lean and mean” with the staff, cutting back their hours so he does not have to let anybody go. Staff Writers David Kronke, Harrison Sheppard and Rick Orlov and The Associated Press contributed to this story.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Learn to Speak: Toss a Spear

first_imgHuman language evolved after our ancestors learned to throw a spear, according to William H. Calvin, in his new book A Brief History of the Mind: From Apes to Intellect and Beyond (Oxford, 2003).  Robin Dunbar is not too sure about this, in a book review in the Feb. 26 issue of Nature.1  Although he respects Calvin, he is not convinced of his thesis for the origin of human language:I found the themes of the book, broadly speaking, congenial, and the account well informed and authoritative, as one might expect from a neuroscientist and science popularist of Calvin’s stature.  However, there are aspects of this particular book that I found less satisfying.  Calvin’s insistence on the importance of a gesturally based phase to language evolution does not, I think, make sense.  Language is a parsing skill, and, even though parsing is a hierarchical process, it seems to me to be a very different kind of skill from that used in coordinated throwing.  Manipulating concepts is not the same kind of activity as manipulating muscle masses.  Nor does the timing really work.  The evidence, as Calvin himself notes, points to a period about 500,000 years ago as the likely timing for the origin of speech, if not full-blown language.  But the archaeological record is very clear that real projectile-based hunting did not become widespread until the Upper Palaeolithic revolution, which kicked in around 50,000 years ago (perhaps a little earlier in Africa).  The evolution of speech, then, pre-dates the fine muscle control of aimed throwing by a very wide margin.He also found Calvin’s look into the future “unconvincing.”  Nevertheless, Dunbar is glad that “After a century of neglect, the mind has suddenly become an issue of evolutionary interest once again.”1Robin Dunbar, “Could throwing spears have laid the foundations for language acquisition?”, Nature 427, 783 (26 February 2004); doi:10.1038/427783a.Dunbar is way too polite with his criticism.  Why?  Darwin Party members are loathe to call each other stupid.  It might provide fodder for those darned creationists.    In support of evolution, all Calvin provides is a just-so story that spear throwing evolved our brains into speech machines.  How can that be?  It violates the principle learned by every child: “sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.”  One would think that words, the later weapon, would be more effective in the struggle for survival.    What Calvin lacks in evidence for evolution he makes up for in evidence against it.  Dunbar states:Notwithstanding the enthusiasm in the 1970s and 1980s for the similarities between humans and our primate cousins, both in popular culture and among academics, the fact is that humans are very different from even our ape sister species.  William Calvin’s latest book looks at how different we really are.    The essence of Calvin’s argument is that the difference between humans and other animals comes down to what he calls “structured stuff” (that is, coordinated, structured task processing).  One of the most obvious examples is the way we deconstruct sentences to expose their meaning.Apes, of course, have no such abilities, nor are there any transitional forms between us (see 01/20/2004 entry).  From this clear statement declaring the gulf between apes and man, he launches into the JSS (just-so story):We can do this, he argues, because we evolved the capacity to coordinate fine-tuned movements in the context of throwing.  The great revolution in human evolutionary history stems from the shift from the older forms of heavy-duty hunting, mostly by dint of thrusting spears, to projectile hunting (throwing spears or using bows), which required careful aiming and much finer coordination.    Practice at these activities fine-tuned the neural machinery that allowed the delicate motor control required for speech and language.  Much is made, in this respect, of the growing evidence for the brain’s ability to coopt neural circuits.  For example, the neural substrates for reading have different location in the brain in different individuals, as one might expect of a skill that does not have a long evolutionary history.  This ’softwiring’, as Calvin calls it, is clearly of major importance in human cognition.Convinced?  This is so lame.  So Lamarckian.  Even if practice stretched a hunter’s brain, it would not help his kids any more than a giraffe stretching its neck would promote the inheritance of that acquired characteristic.  The trait has to get into the gametes.    No problem, we’ll just modify the JSS a little.  Presumably, a chance mutation gave a hunter a more complex brain, granting him better aim at spear-throwing.  He brought more meat back to the cave, which made him more attractive to the females.  So he had more kids bearing the same mutation, who survived to reproductive age while all the others starved.  Isn’t evolutionary storytelling fun?  You never have to prove your JSS.  As long as it keeps the Darwin Party in power, it is such a dreamy, endless pastime.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Animals Are “Overengineered” for Navigation

first_imgAnimals outshine us in many ways, but one capability that should humble us is animal navigation.  From spiders to mice, from birds to bees, the ability of animals to find their way around is truly astonishing, and James L. Gould of Princeton has raised our awareness of just how astonishing in a short article in Current Biology (March 23, 2004).1    He starts by explaining that navigation is more than just knowing which way you are pointed: “Nearly all animals move in an oriented way,” he says, “but navigation is something more: the directed movement toward a goal, as opposed to steering toward or away from, say, light or gravity.  Navigation involves the neural processing of sensory inputs to determine a direction and perhaps distance.”  As an example, he mentions how honeybees have to correct for the angle of the sun from morning to afternoon.  This involves much more than orienting at a fixed angle.  The bee has to use changing sensory information to maintain its internal map.    Gould mentions four stumbling blocks that prevented early investigators from appreciating the navigational abilities of animals.  Researchers apparently assumed natural selection was sufficient to explain it all.  He writes, “Several trends reflecting favorably on natural selection and poorly on human imagination characterized early studies of navigation.”  The stumbling blocks investigators have had to get over include:Spectral Breadth:  Early researchers assumed that animals were limited to our own human senses, but found out they can utilize a shopping list of cues invisible to us: ultraviolet light, infrared light, magnetic fields, electric fields, chemical pheromones, ultrasonic sounds and infrasonic sounds.  We were “blind to our own blindness,” he says, “and there is no reason to assume the list is complete.”Complexity: Another “crippling tendency” of early investigators was “what navigation pioneer Donald Griffin called our innate ‘simplicity filter’: the desire to believe that animals do things in the least complex way possible.”  Perhaps it was from our own pride of place, but according to Gould, we should be humbled:Experience, however, tells us that animals whose lives depend on accurate navigation are uniformly overengineered.  Not only do they frequently wring more information out of the cues that surround them than we can, or use more exotic or weaker cues than we find conceivable, they usually come equipped with alternative strategies – a series of backups between which they switch depending on which is providing the most reliable information.Recalibration:  Early studies assumed animals just needed to learn a trick once (a phenomenon called imprinting, true in some short-lived animals.)  Then they found out that some animals are able to recalibrate their instruments.Cognition:  The school of psychology known as behaviorism, which denies instinct, “puts a ceiling on the maximum level of mental activity subject to legitimate investigation,” Gould chides.  As a result of this bias, “most researchers deliberately ignored or denigrated the evidence for cognitive processing in navigating animals.”  Not all animals exhibit cognitive intervention, Gould admits.  But he then makes a very unDarwinian countercharge: “However, the obvious abilities of hunting spiders and honey bees to plan novel routes make it equally clear that phylogenetic distance to humans is no sure guide to the sophistication of a species’ orientation strategies.”    He gives an example: “One of the problems we inherited from behaviorism was the assumption that exploratory behavior must be rewarded.  However, many species examine their surroundings voluntarily and, in fact, do so in detail.”  (See example on mice below.)Let’s look at just a few of the “believe it or not” examples Gould showcases in the article:Honeybees:  Here is an example of switching inputs to get the most reliable information.  “A honey bee, for instance, may set off for a goal using its time-compensated sun compass.  When a cloud covers the sun, it may change to inferring the sun’s position from UV patterns in the sky and opt a minute later for a map-like strategy when it encounters a distinctive landmark.  Lastly, it may ignore all of these cues as it gets close enough to its goal to detect the odors or visual cues provided by the flowers.”Mice:  Here is an example of the “overengineering” Gould spoke of.  Many field animals, like mice, have a strong drive to acquire information about their home range in advance of need, whether or not (as behaviorism would expect) they get an immediate reward.  “Consider mice,” he says,which not only gallop endlessly in running wheels, but actually prefer difficulty, such as square ‘wheels’, or wheels with barriers that must be jumped.  Given a 430 meter long opaque three-dimensional maze of pipes, mice will work out the shortest path within three days, and without reward.Navigation requires determining direction:This can be achieved in two ways, and mice use both: they can use another landmark from their mental map and triangulate the direction of the goal, or they can use a landmark-independent compass like the earth’s magnetic field.–and they never joined the boy scouts.  What’s more, mice “can also navigate perfectly well, even if the habitat fails to provide useful landmarks.  They will remember the direction and length of each leg of their outward journey and integrate the result when they are ready to return and set off home,” even without a trail of bread crumbs. Pigeons:  Daytime provides celestial cues.  “…once the relationship between azimuth and time of day is memorized,” Gould says, “the animal has a highly accurate compass.”  We’ve all heard about the navigational feats of homing pigeons.  They can discern ultraviolet (UV) light, which accentuates polarization patterns of scattered sunlight, for drawing their mental map, and add to it individual data points like “the average of a night’s attempts to escape from a cage, or some other directional measure.”  The cues help them derive a mean vector, with direction pointing to the goal, and length representing scatter.  When all the cues line up, they’ve got their bearing.Migratory birds:  Birds who migrate between nesting grounds and wintering grounds can use sun cues, star cues, magnetic fields and landmarks to find their way.  Not only that, they can recalibrate the cues for seasonal changes, latitude, and longitude.  This requires recalibration:To infer the pole point through broken clouds, the animal’s map of the sky must be updated.  And as the migrants move south in the fall, new sets of stars in the southern sky appear, while northern stars slip below the horizon.  Clearly, changes in both season and latitude make relearning the stars essential.  Only fairly recently has this constant updating been demonstrated.”In fact, for unknown reasons, “nocturnal migrants calibrate their star pole to the magnetic pole.  Instead of simply taking the pole point as the true guide, the birds constantly recalibrate the magnetic pole to the geographic pole, and then the geographic pole to the magnetic pole.”Latitude: Fish, turtles, lobsters, and birds all determine their latitude by the angle of the magnetic field.  “In theory,” Gould says, “animals could obtain the same information from the sun’s noon elevation, but I know of no case in which this traditional human solution is used.”  The critters must know something we don’t.Longitude: house wrens, pigeons, sharks, salmon, sea turtles and spiny lobsters have all conquered a navigational problem that “bedeviled human navigators until very recently,” the problem of determining longitude.  How do they know distance east from west?  How can house wrens find their way back, unerringly, to the same nest box after a long flight at a different time of year from when they left?  “The apparent answer to this conundrum is provided by a map sense,” Gould answers.  The earth’s magnetic field provides both a map and a compass – just the tools you would need if released in an unfamiliar area. Pigeons again:  When homing pigeons circle around before heading home, they are reading the local map of magnetic gradients and extrapolating it from the one they learned at home.  How do pigeons detect the earth’s magnetic field?  They actually have magnetite grains in their heads, in the ethymoid sinus.  Experiments have shown that magnetic anomalies make the birds disoriented.  A sharp pulse of magnetism can severely impair their compass.  But remagnetize the organ by putting it into a magnetic field, and the bird is back to normalGould ends by pointing out two of the biggest challenges to researchers studying animal navigation: (1) the nature of the map sense, and (2) the issue of recalibration, which is still puzzling.  “The interaction of these specific learning programs,” he promises, “doubtlessly holds many magnificent secrets.” 1James L. Gould, “Magazine: Animal Navigation,” Current BiologyVol 14, R221-R224, 23 March 2004.Wow.  Thank you, Dr. Gould.  This article contains absolutely no hints about how such abilities could have evolved; in fact, it contains a couple of off-handed swipes at the notion that natural selection could explain them, or that skill correlates with “phylogenetic distance.”  This is surprising, considering that James L. Gould is a member of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton.  It could just as well have been written by Dr. Gary Parker at the Institute for Creation Research.  It’s a wonder the editors of Current Biology let this one get by without the required pinch of incense to Emperor Charlie.    Notice that these highly refined and accurate navigational skills are possessed by a wide variety of animals: mammals (e.g., mice), insects (e.g., Monarch butterflies — see 05/23/2003 and 07/09/2002 headlines), birds (e.g., Pacific golden plovers, which can navigate over open sea to the Hawaiian islands without having ever seen them), reptiles (e.g., sea turtles), crustaceans (e.g., lobsters), and fish (e.g., salmon).  Skill does not scale with presumed evolutionary advancement: for instance, the spiny lobster wins the prize for magnetic mapping (see 01/06/2003 headline).  Even bacteria and plants can orient themselves with respect to environmental cues.  Humans were given ability to build tools that can navigate a spacecraft to Saturn, but we must surely stand in awe of a God who could put technology that outperforms NASA into a bird brain.  This article goes to show that the film “Incredible Creatures That Defy Evolution” could become an infinite series.  Click your way back through the “Amazing” chain links for many more examples.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

MTN, Intel to push broadband in Africa

first_imgSAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Importance of industry leaders Emerging technology investment “These initiatives will contribute to the development of young people in Africa by equipping them with up to date maths and science skills as well as life skills such as critical thinking in the current knowledge economy,” MTN said in a statement this week. According to the statement, such innovations have the potential to create new industries and offer employment to Africa’s growing young population. South Africa’s MTN Group has signed a memorandum of understanding with the USA’s Intel Corporation which will see the two companies collaborating to accelerate the deployment of broadband access in Africa and the Middle East. Other areas of collaboration include joint efforts by the MTN Foundation and Intel Education’s corporate social responsibility initiatives to equip students and teachers with technology skills. “MTN recognises the strategic value of partnering with an industry player of Intel’s calibre and stature,” De Faria said. 2 August 2010 According to the statement, the memorandum also underpins the importance of industry leaders such as Intel and MTN to collaborate in order to bring sustainable ICT development to the Africa and Middle East region. Intel’s venture capital division, Intel Capital, and the MTN Group will also invest in emerging technology companies that are innovative and demonstrate a potential for advancing the ICT sector by developing products that contribute to solving typically African business and social problems. “In this way we can accelerate Africa’s entry into the 21st century knowledge and digital economy which will give its citizens economic opportunities similar to those in developed countries,” said Graylish. MTN senior vice-president for innovation Christian de Faria said the company believed the memorandum of understanding would facilitate the establishment of joint initiatives to support both their broadband strategy as well as corporate social responsibility projects. “Both companies have expertise in different aspects of ICT deployment and together we can accelerate bridging the digital divide on the continent.” The collaboration covers a wide spectrum of initiatives, including areas such as broadband access through pushing WiMax deployment, offering affordable PC bundles for ordinary African consumers and entrepreneurs, and introducing cost-effective internet browsing devices. “Strategies developed by MTN and Intel to connect the next generation of broadband users in Africa and the Middle East were a perfect fit, which is why we went into discussions to collaborate,” said Intel sales and marketing vice president Gordon Graylish. Skills developmentlast_img read more

This is a big year for spray nozzles and replacement decisions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This is the time of the year you must complete shopping for nozzles because the spraying season is just around the corner. Although nozzles are some of the least expensive components of a sprayer, they hold a high value in their ability to influence sprayer performance. First, nozzles meter the desired amount of liquid sprayed per acre. Second, nozzles help us spray the liquid uniformly over the width of the sprayer boom. Third, nozzles influence droplet size, affecting both target coverage and spray drift risk. For these key reasons, you need to make sure your sprayer is equipped with the right kind and size of nozzles, and they are still performing within the acceptable range of performance they delivered when they were new.If you were happy with your nozzles last year, and if you are not switching to a new pesticide, all you need to do this spring before the spraying season is to check the flow rate of each nozzle to make sure the nozzles are not worn out. You will need to compare the flow rate of your nozzles with the flow rate of new nozzles of the same type and size at the same pressure. You can find information on the flow rate of new nozzles in nozzle catalogs or company web sites. A deviation of 10% between flow rates of your nozzles and the new nozzles is considered as acceptable. If the difference is greater than 10% of the new nozzle flow rate, it is time to get rid of the old nozzles and replace them with new nozzles.Whether you are using the nozzles you already have on the boom, or getting new nozzles, there are some new issues you will need to consider before the start of the sprayer season. Typically, we take into account many important factors including: sprayer operation parameters (such as application rate, spray pressure, travel speed); application type (broadcast, band, directed, air assisted); target crop (field crops, vegetables, vineyard, shrubs and trees, etc.); and spray drift risk. Are you aware of specific nozzle “requirements” on labels?In the past, the labels on chemicals gave some vague and general statements when referring to application equipment. For example, we used to see (it is still the same for many chemicals) on labels statements such as: “use spray equipment to provide thorough coverage of the canopy.” There was noPhoto by Ken Chamberlein, OSU/OARDChelp with explaining what “thorough coverage” is, and how to achieve it. Then, we saw labels giving us more specific recommendations on nozzles such as: “use nozzles that provide medium spray quality” or “do not use nozzles that produce droplets in coarse or larger spray qualities.” Most recently, the labels of the most talked-about 2,4-D or Dicamba herbicides include very specific requirements on which nozzle or nozzles must be used when spraying these products. For example, one of these products requires using only one type and size of nozzle. Simple interpretation of this requirement is that you would be violating the label if you use any other type or size of nozzle. So, it is your responsibility to comply with the label recommendation.Why are specific nozzles required by manufacturers of 2,4-D and dicamba herbicides? Although manufacturers of these products claim that the new formulations containing 2,4-D or Dicamba are more resistant to drift of these active materials due to high volatility characteristics of similar products used decades ago, they are still extremely concerned about the physical drift of these products in droplets. Therefore, since these products are systemic in nature, they should work even when large size droplets are used during spraying. With this in mind, the manufacturers of these products have decided on recommending specific nozzles that produce droplets that are in the category of “Extra Coarse” or “Ultra Coarse.” Physical drift of such large droplets will likely reduce the risk for drift to minimum levels. Although there are many nozzles that can provide these desired droplet size classes at certain pressures, at this point you are advised to choose exactly the nozzles identified on their labels. Act now if you will be switching to new nozzles.If you are going to use one of the new 2,4-D or Dicamba herbicides this year, it is very likely that you do not have on the boom the specific nozzles required by the manufacturers of these herbicides. That means, you will need to purchase the recommended nozzles and put them on the boom. Since many growers would want to do that, there may be short-term shortages of these nozzles in stores from which you purchase nozzles. So, act now and get the nozzles you need before experiencing potential problems with availability of these nozzles. Keep several types of nozzles on the boomIt is very likely that you will be using your sprayers to spray a variety of pesticides during the growing season. Remember that one specific type of nozzle will not be best for all applications. For this reason, it is best to have several types and sizes of nozzles on the boom so that you can switch to the “best” nozzle choice for a given spraying job. There are various types of sprayer components and setups you can buy to configure your boom so the new set up allows you to easily switch from one nozzle to another instantly. Photo by Ken Chamberlein, OSU/OARDCSome final thoughtsNozzles are typically the least costly items on a sprayer, but they play a key role in the final outcome from a spraying job: achieving maximum efficacy from the pesticide applied while reducing the off-target (drift) movement of pesticides to minimum. Pesticides work well if the rates on labels are achieved during application. This can be achieved only if the right nozzle type and the proper size of the nozzles are on the sprayer, and the sprayer is operated properly.Although the Apps and tables in catalogs may expedite the nozzle size selection process, it is best to understand the process and the math nozzle manufacturers use to generate the values listed in tables, and to generate nozzle recommendations in their Apps. A new Ohio State University Extension Publication, titled “Selecting the best nozzle for the job” gives step-by-step guidelines for selecting the most appropriate spray nozzle for a given application situation. The publication is available online at following web site: http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/fabe-528.last_img read more

Junior Goat Shows

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion: Paige Pence, New Carlisle (heavyweight champion)Res. Grand Champion: Ava Shroyer, DeGraff (heavyweight reserve champion)Third Overall: Paige Pence, New Carlisle (middleweight champion)Fourth Overall: Katie Egbert, Botkins (middleweight reserve champion)Fifth Overall: Ava Shroyer, DeGraff (lightweight champion)Junior Market  Show resultsLightweight Champ: Ava Shroyer, DeGraffLightweight Res. Champ: Grace Day, Frankfort Middleweight Champ: Paige Pence, New CarlisleMiddleweight Res. Champ: Katie Egbert, Botkins Heavyweight Champ:Paige Pence, New CarlisleHeavyweight Res. Champ: Ava Shroyer, DeGraff Junior Dairy Goat Show resultsAlpineChamp: Ashley Bailey, LondonRes. Champ: Heather Cade, Galena Alpine milkersChamp: Hannah Depew, ChillecotheRes. Champ: Jenna Bailey, London LaManchaChamp: Kolton Baer, KinsmanRes. Champ: Kolton Baer, Kinsman LaMancha milkersChamp: Heather Cade, GalenaRes. Champ: Heather Cade, Galena AOBChamp: Allie Bohse, West MiltonRes. Champ: Jenna Johnson, Delaware AOB milkersChamp: Keeton Ables, SullivanRes. Champ: Gavin Manion, Ashland NubiansChamp: Cole Spitler, West ManchesterRes. Champ: Courtney Hubbard, Cortland Nubian milkersChamp: Hunter Dye, SunburyRes. Champ: Cole Spitler, West Manchester Recorded GradeChamp: Kolton Baer, KinsmanRes. Champ: Kolton Baer, Kinsman Recorded Grade milkersChamp: Heather Cade, GalenaRes. Champ: Heather Cade, Galena SaanenChamp: Jenna Johnson, DelawareRes. Champ: Hannah Saum, Lancaster Saanen milkersChamp: Hannah Saum, LancasterRes. Champ: Taylor Gottfried, Tiffin ToggenburgChamp: Cole Spitler, West ManchesterRes. Champ: Cole Spitler, West Manchester Toggenburg milkersChamp: Landyn Phipps, ThornvilleRes. Champ: Heather Cade, Galena Landyn Phipps and Elisha Stratton with their Toggenburgs Cole Spitler did well with his Recorded Grade Hannah Saum from Fairfield County with her Saanen Paige Pence gets emotional after beings selected as the middleweight champion Wyatt Borer competes for middleweight champion. Briley Ashcroft, from Guysville, in the middleweight champion drive Grace Day had the Res. Champ. lightweight. Jada Shroyer watches the judge. The judge checks out Ava Shroyer’s champion lightweight wether. Lightweight class Cheyenne Watson and Heather Cade with their Recorded Grade dairy goats The judge shakes the hand of Paige Pence for grand champion. Heavyweight champion drive Jonathan Yenser from Botkins with his heavyweight market goat Heavyweight exhibitorslast_img read more

Tweetmi: Another Twitter Search Engine with a Twist

first_imgTags:#news#Product Reviews#twitter#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Become a FanOne feature that makes Tweetmi unique is that it gives users the option to become ‘fans’ of a certain topic. While this is definitely an interesting concept, users actually have to send out a tweet about the fact that they are now fans of ‘RWW’ or ‘Follow Friday,’ which somehwat limits the usefulness of this feature. Another feature we liked is that the application can show you a list of all the Twitter users who tweeted a popular link. Like most Twitter search engines, Tweemi displays a list of the most popular links about a topic in a sidebar.Given that there are already numerous Twitter search engines and more comprehensive real-time search engines like OneRiot on the market, Tweetmi will probably have a bit of a struggle to attract a dedicated user base. It is however, a perfectly capable Twitter search engine that offers all the typical features you would expect and definitely worth a try. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts There are, of course, already numerous Twitter search engines at this point and every new one will have to offer users a very good reason to switch from their current favorite. Tweetmi is jumping into the fray with a Twitter search engine that focuses on presenting users with a more personalized view. While the service also works well as a regular real-time Twitter search engine, users who sign in to Tweetmi will also see the most active users in their Twitter stream and the top stories from the people they already follow.In addition, Tweetmi allows users who are signed in through Twitter’s Oauth login mechanism to quickly reply and retweet any story. In this respect, Tweetmi is quite similar to Twazzup, which also gives users the ability to interact with Twitter directly. Unlike Twazzup, though, Tweetmi doesn’t offer the ability to save searches, however. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… frederic lardinoislast_img read more

Hackers Helping Haiti: Find or Organize a Hackathon Near You

first_imgTags:#news#NYT#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img jolie odell Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting In an ongoing effort to help the poorest country in the Americas survive and recover from a devastating earthquake, hackers around the world are participating in CrisisCamp Hackathons this Saturday, January 16.The unconference-style events are free for attendees, who are asked to volunteer their time and expertise to create technology projects that provide data, information, maps and technical assistance to non-governmental organizations, relief agencies and the public. The CrisisCamps being held this weekend will all directly benefit Haitian relief efforts.Volunteers of all kinds – the technically talented and others, too – are requested to sign up.Hackathons are being organized in Silicon Valley, London, Washington DC and Boulder/Denver. Some of these events still need organization and leadership help; volunteers are asked to take charge and donate whatever time or resources they have available.UPDATE: Hackathons are also being organized in Los Angeles and Brooklyn.Proposed projects so far include a base layer map for Port Au Prince for NGOs and relief agencies, a family locator system, a volunteer skill matrix, a news aggregator to coordinate data feeds and ongoing definitions to support ongoing CrisisCamp efforts. For an idea of how these kinds of tech can help in times of national and natural disasters, check out Chad Catacchio’s post on crisis mapping.CrisisCamp’s goal is to gather topic experts, app developers and emergency first responders to create better technology and practices for crisis management and disaster relief. For updates and more information, follow CrisisCamp on Twitter.For more on what technologists are doing to help relief efforts in Haiti, check out these other RWW posts:Internet Rallies to Help Haiti: Here’s What You Can Do Right NowGoogle Offers Satellite Images of Haiti, Post-EarthquakeCloudCamp for Haiti: How the Cloud Can Help Aid Effortslast_img read more