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NOW HIRING 50 New Job Openings In Wilmington Week of April 14 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are job listings previously published on Wilmington Apple during the week of April 14, 2019:Full-Time Physical Therapist at Wilmington Public SchoolsFull-Time Customer Service Representative at D.B. RobertsFull-Time Commissioning Manager at Limbach Facility ServicesFull-Time/Part-Tiem Member Services Representative at Planet FitnessFull-Time Warehouse Associate at West Springfield Auto Parts Inc.Full-Time Warehouse Stockroom Associate at NAPA Auto PartsFull-Time Delivery Driver at AFR Furniture RentalFull-Time Crew Chief Technician at SERVPROFull-Time Delivery Driver at FedEx WarehouseFull-Time Senior Mechanical Engineer at AmetekFull-Time Senior Research Scientist at EnergetiqFull-Time Sr. Quality Regulatory Compliance Engineer at EnergetiqFull-Time Office Administrator at EnergetiqFull-Time Director of Engineering at EnergetiqFull-Time Product Support Engineer at EnergetiqPart-Time Temporary Driver at FedExPart-Time Nanny For 1 Wilmington ChildFull-Time CDL Relief Driver at Pepsi Co.Full-Time Landscape Maintenance Crew Leader at Garrick-SantoFull-Time/Part-Time Pizza Counter/Register Help at Wilmington House of PizzaFull-Time Marketing Specialist at Charles River LabsFull-Time Associate Director Marketing at Charles River LabsFull-Time Product Manager (Discovery Oncology) at Charles River LabsFull-Time AV Rack Builder at Red ThreadFull-Time National Accounts Project Coordinator at Standard ElectricPart-Time Inside Sales Associate at Superior SealcoatPart-Time Cashier at K1 SpeedFull-Time Cargo Van Driver at OptimaPart-Time Babysitter For Wilmington TwinsFull-Time Entry Level Sales at Capital Carpet & Flooring SpecialistsFull-Time Driver at West Springfield Auto PartsFull-Time Counter Sales at West Springfield Auto PartsPart-Time Apparel & Accessories Team Member at TargetPart-Time Electronics Team Member at TargetFull-Time Overnight Custodian at Planet FitnessFull-Time Overnight Closer at Planet FitnessFull-Time HVAC Service Technician at InLine Mechanical LLCFull-Time Member Service Representative at Align Credit UnionPart-Time Certified Personal Trainer at NA FitnessPart-Time Sandwich Artist at SubwayFull-Time Class D Delivery Driver at J. Polep Distribution ServicesFull-Time Administrative Assistant/Receptionist at O’Brien ConstructionFull-Time 1st Shift Production Technician at CutisPharmaFull-Time HR Business Partner at Charles River LabsFull-Time Service Manager/Technician at Ritchie & SonsFull-Time Deployment Specialist at Locus RoboticsFull-Time Deployment Project Manager at Locus RoboticsFull-Time Sales Executive at Locus RoboticsFull-Time Inbound Sales Specialist at Parterre Flooring SystemsFull-Time Customer Service/Technician at PALMS Environmental: PALMS Environmental, located in Wilmington, is a rental company serving the Environmental Consultant and Engineering community.  We offer a full line of monitoring and sampling equipment for water, soil and air since 1999.  We are looking for an individual who can maintain our equipment, interact with customers, perform deliveries and wear many hats as required in a small business. No experience is required, we will train you.  This is a full time position and mother’s hours are acceptable. PALMS Environmental offers an excellent working environment, and competitive salary with benefits. Interested candidates should contact: Dennis Hart, palmsenv@yahoo.com(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 50 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 18, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of July 14, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Business”last_img read more

2018 A year of creepy AF smart home headlines

first_img See All Google’s efforts were impressive, but Duplex didn’t sit right with all of us. “In this age of disinformation, where fake news thrives and the public has trust issues with technology, Google designed a machine that can deceive humans,” wrote CNET’s Bridget Carey, who also voiced concerns over the fact that Google’s Assistant never identified itself as a robot. “Gosh, what could go wrong?”Two days after that editorial, Google told CNET explicitly that it will launch Duplex with “disclosure built-in” for better transparency.An Amazon Key in-home delivery: not as creepy as we expected! Tyler Lizenby/CNET Then there’s Amazon Key, which looks to leverage smart lock tech at your front door to let delivery people drop Amazon packages off inside your home. The Amazon Key Home Kit even includes an Amazon Cloud Cam to let you watch the delivery in real time right from your phone (more on cameras in just a bit, by the way).The idea of granting a stranger authorized access to your home was unnerving for many of us — but in the end, Amazon Key wasn’t nearly as creepy as we expected. In fact, the most we ever saw of the delivery people was an arm reaching inside the cracked door to drop a package off just inside. From Megan Wollerton’s recap:”While I started out hesitant about in-home delivery, I’d be comfortable enough to use it going forward (and to recommend it to frequent Amazon customers) — as long as I can keep an eye on whoever’s delivering the packages from my phone.”Camera creep2018 might be the year when the mainstream smart home opened its eyes, with a flood of new camera-equipped products and services designed to help us keep watch over our homes or stay in touch with loved ones. Early in the year, for instance, Amazon bought the home security startup Ring and its popular video doorbell. Now, a new app for Ring users called Neighbors lets you share, view and comment on local crime activity, complete with video clips from Ring cameras and doorbells in your community.The Nest Hello video doorbell is one of a growing number of smart home products using cameras equipped with facial-recognition technology. Chris Monroe/CNET That’s an appealing pitch to some, but consider the company’s recent patent applications focused on facial recognition. Each considers ways to use Ring cameras to identify “suspicious” people (convicted felons, sex offenders, etc.), then automatically alert law enforcement. That raised fresh surveillance state concerns from the American Civil Liberties Union.”Amazon is dreaming of a dangerous future,” the ACLU’s Jacob Snow said in a statement, “with its technology at the center of a massive decentralized surveillance network, running real-time facial recognition on members of the public using cameras installed in people’s doorbells.”We expect to see more uses of facial recognition technology in the coming year, including from cameras that are already equipped with the feature, like Google’s Nest Hello video doorbell. In other words, don’t expect this issue to fade from sight.And it’s not just the front door — from night-vision security cameras to connected baby monitors, people are parking cameras inside their homes, too. Doing so might require you to wrap your head around some potential privacy vulnerabilities. For instance, earlier this year, researchers from Kaspersky Lab warned that hackers could turn your own cameras against you by spying on you, or by fooling you with a duplicate, “cloned” feed. Your next vacation rental might have security cameras inside, too, which raises concerns about whether or not you could be filmed without realizing it during a weekend getaway.  That brings us to smart displays, a new smart home category that promises to bring even more cameras into people’s kitchens and living rooms. Amazon was first into the space with the Echo Show and Echo Spot, and Google soon followed suit with a suite of its own Google Assistant-powered touchscreens, including the Lenovo Smart Display and the JBL Link View. Tellingly, Google opted not to include a camera in its flagship, first-party smart display, the Google Home Hub.Of course, there’s another smart display worth mentioning. In fact, it gets the next section of this post all to itself.fl-portal-10 Chris Monroe/CNET Smart home hubris from FacebookThere was a collective “you’ve gotta be f***ing kidding me” from many of us who write about tech when Facebook, in the midst of scandal after scandal after scandal over the misuse of user data, unveiled the new Facebook Portal in-home video chatting devices. Because sure, why not let a transparency-challenged company that’s been — at best — wildly irresponsible with user data bring person-tracking cameras and always-listening microphones into your living room? They promise they’ll behave! Tags CNET Smart Home Aug 31 • The best coffee grinders you can buy right now More recently, a judge in New Hampshire ordered Amazon to hand over the Alexa audio of a user accused of two counts of first degree murder. For now, Amazon is fighting the ruling.”Amazon will not release customer information without a valid and binding legal demand properly served on us,” an Amazon spokesperson told CNET. “Amazon objects to overbroad or otherwise inappropriate demands as a matter of course.”   Concerns about silent, “ultrasonic” audio attacks also raised our collective assistant anxiety this year, with researchers claiming that the most popular voice platforms were vulnerable to audio cues at frequencies too high for humans to hear. Researchers at UC Berkeley claim they were even able to fool Mozilla’s open-source DeepSpeech voice-to-text engine by hiding ultrasonic audio cues within brief snippets of music.Maybe most disconcerting — to date, none of the major tech companies responsible for these voice platforms have denied that attacks like these are possible.google-duplex-orens-hummus-demo-2-2Enlarge ImageWith Google Duplex, Google Assistant will call restaurants and salons to make reservations on your behalf. Google’s demo was one of the most convincingly life-like AI use-cases we’d ever seen. James Martin/CNET Big moonshots, big questions2018 saw some notable new ideas about where smart home tech may be headed — and some of those ideas raised a lot of questions.Let’s start with Google Duplex, the search giant’s effort to let the artificially intelligent Google Assistant make phone calls on your behalf. Google touted the feature as a way for the Assistant to book things like haircuts and dinner reservations — and the demo was pretty mind-blowing. Watch for yourself below: 1 Consumer Product Safety Commission asks: How dangerous is the internet of things? Here’s what Congress wants to know about Amazon’s Echo Dot for kids Senators call on FTC to investigate smart TVs tracking viewers’ data Your smart air conditioner could help bring down the power grid, researchers say California governor signs country’s first IoT security law Comment Google’s Duplex: AI that makes you think you’re talking to a human Voice of concern: Smart assistants create new openings for hackers Watch Google Assistant fire a gun Robot or human? Google Assistant will leave you guessing And hey, amid escalating scrutiny, perhaps they will. “We have a responsibility to protect your data,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a March 21 statement following the company’s Cambridge Analytica data-mining scandal. “And if we can’t then we don’t deserve to serve you.”Just keep in mind that since then, Zuckerberg’s company has come under continued fire for not doing enough to deal with a flood of fake news and Russian trolls on its platform during the 2016 US election. In July of this year, the company admitted to sharing user information with hardware and software partners even after claiming to discontinue the practice in 2015. Just this week, the New York Times reported that Facebook used “special arrangements” like those even more than the company initially disclosed — namely, to give Microsoft’s Bing search engine access to the names of all Facebook users’ friends without consent, and to allow Netflix and Spotify to read Facebook users’ private messages.Netflix denies that it ever accessed people’s private messages on Facebook, or asked for the ability to do so. Spotify didn’t immediately return a request for comment.At any rate, we are well past the point of taking Facebook’s word for anything when it comes to protecting your private data. But, if early market indications showing lots of interest in smart displays this holiday buying season are correct, that’s exactly what some people might be doing. That, or they’ve been drawn in by Facebook’s admittedly slick user interface — enough so to shrug off some extremely valid privacy concerns.After the year we’ve had, maybe that’s what creeps me out the most. reading • 2018: A year of creepy AF smart home headlines Microphone mishaps (no laughing matter)Things typically get a bit quiet in tech during the months following January’s big CES expo in Las Vegas. This year, a mysterious and disconcerting bout of laughter echoed out of the silence.The cackle in question came from Alexa, when users of Amazon’s popular voice assistant began sharing clips of eerie, unprompted laughter emitting from their Echo devices. Once the phenomenon began to trend on Twitter, Amazon confirmed the issue and told us it was looking into a fix.2018 saw a number of stories about Echo devices acting strangely. Chris Monroe/CNET “In rare circumstances, Alexa can mistakenly hear the phrase ‘Alexa, laugh,'” the company ultimately explained. “We are changing that phrase to be ‘Alexa, can you laugh?’ which is less likely to have false positives, and we are disabling the short utterance ‘Alexa, laugh.’ We are also changing Alexa’s response from simply laughter to ‘Sure, I can laugh’ followed by laughter.”In another Alexa headache this May, a family in Oregon claimed that their Echo device recorded audio of a private conversation and sent it out to a random contact without warning. Amazon’s explanation? It was the Alexa equivalent of a butt-dial.”[The] Echo woke up due to a word in background conversation sounding like ‘Alexa,'” an Amazon spokesperson told CNET. “Then, the subsequent conversation was heard as a ‘send message’ request. At which point, Alexa said out loud, ‘To whom?’ At which point, the background conversation was interpreted as a name in the customer’s contact list. Alexa then asked out loud, ‘[contact name], right?’ Alexa then interpreted background conversation as ‘right.'””As unlikely as this string of events is, we are evaluating options to make this case even less likely,” Amazon added.Still, accidents happen. Just today, Reuters reports that Amazon mistakenly sent the wrong files to an Alexa user in Germany who had requested his Echo recordings. As a result, he was able to download and access 1,700 recordings from another user’s household. Per Reuters, Amazon called this an isolated incident, and the result of human error.Assistant anxietyAmazon also found itself navigating potential legal battles over user privacy when Alexa became an apparent witness to not one, but two separate cases of homicide. The first came to a conclusion in March when Amazon agreed to hand over the Alexa audio recordings of a user in Bentonville, Arkansas, who stood accused of of first-degree murder, but only after that user consented to the release. Aug 31 • Alexa can tell you if someone breaks into your house 2018 is just about over, and it’s common for tech reporters to dig back into their beats to try and sum up the year’s news. And, as the CNET Smart Home team took a look back for our own year in review, there was one takeaway we just couldn’t escape:The smart home was… kinda creepy this year.To wit, there were evil cackles from Alexa, fake phone calls from Google Assistant, and concerns a-plenty about the connected cameras and microphones filling our homes. That’s not to mention the well-founded fears about the mass amount of data that these devices are asking to be trusted with (looking right at you, Facebook Portal. No thanks.)So, yeah, if the smart home had you a bit creeped out in 2018, I can’t say I blame you. Here’s a look back at the stories that probably played a role. Tough questions for the smart home in 2018 So Alexa decided to laugh randomly while I was in the kitchen. Freaked @SnootyJuicer and I out. I thought a kid was laughing behind me. pic.twitter.com/6dblzkiQHp— CaptHandlebar (@CaptHandlebar) February 23, 2018 Aug 30 • Battling bot vacs: iRobot Roomba S9+ vs Neato Botvac D7 Connected 4:25 Aug 31 • Best smart light bulbs for 2019 (plus switches, light strips, accessories and more) Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice 2018 in creepy assistants CNET Smart Home • Smart Homelast_img read more

FACT CHECK Democratic Response To State Of The Union

first_imgCopyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass., is delivering the Democratic response to President Trump’s State of the Union address on Tuesday.Rep. Joe Kennedy, D-Mass., delivered the rebuttal to President Trump’s State of the Union address Tuesday night. Democratic leaders called Kennedy a “relentless fighter for working Americans” in their announcement of his selection. At 37, Kennedy has served in Congress since 2013.“It would be easy to dismiss the past year as chaos. Partisanship. Politics,” he said. “But it’s far bigger than that. This administration isn’t just targeting the laws that protect us — they are targeting the very idea that we are all worthy of protection.”Editor’s note: The transcript will be updated throughout the speech. While we are working to correct errors, it may contain discrepancies and typographical errors. Sharelast_img read more

Son hacks mother to death in W Midnapore

first_imgKolkata: A person from West Midnapore district allegedly hacked his mother to death following an altercation on Wednesday, police said. “Gorachand Murmu, a resident of West Midnapore district’s Goaltore allegedly killed his mother Hiramoni Murmu (55) by repeatedly striking her with an axe on Wednesday morning. He has been arrested,” an officer from Goaltore police station said. According to the neighbours, Murmu attacked his mother following a heated exchange of words and later locked himself up inside a room along with the dead body. “The neighbours heard some loud noise and broke into the house to find the woman’s body in a pool of blood. They caught Murmu and informed the police,” the officer said. “The body has been sent for autopsy. The accused will be produced in court on Thursday,” he added.last_img read more

Three sentenced to life imprisonment for murder

first_imgKolkata: Three persons were sentenced to life imprisonment in a murder case on Friday. The main accused in the case is undergoing trial in a separate court as he was minor at the time of the murder. After he turned 18, the trial was shifted from the juvenile court.According to police, on July 22, 2016, officers of New Town police station found a body of a man near Tin Kanya Mor, on the outskirts of Kadampukur village. The face of the body was smashed to hide the identity of the deceased. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataDuring preliminary investigation, ligature marks was seen around his neck. Later, a suo moto case was initiated against unknown persons on charges of murder. The person was later identified as Nepal Ghosh (40) of Baranagar in North 24-Parganas. During the probe, cops came to know that a youth identified as Jaydeb Das, who was then 17-year-old, had borrowed Rs 10,000 from Ghosh. After the stipulated time to repay the loan was over, Ghosh asked for his money but Das did not return the money and kept on promising that he would repay it soon. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateLater Das, along with his three friends, hatched a plan to murder Ghosh. They planned to kill and rob him so that Das could be exempted from the loan. As per the plan on July 22 of 2016, Das called up Ghosh and asked him to meet at Dunlop. He said he would repay the loan. When Ghosh arrived, Das told him that he would give him the money after he gets it from another person. He called up one of his friend identified as Surajit Karmakar. They boarded Karmakar’s SUV, where two more youths identified as Tridip Biswas and Raju Sil were already present. Later, they drove to New Town and strangled Ghosh inside the car. After Ghosh died, they smashed his face and placed the body beside the road. During investigation, all four of them were arrested. On Friday, 1st Additional District Judge (ADJ), in Barasat Srimayi Kundu sentenced Karmakar, Biswas and Sil to life imprisonment. Trial against Das is still going on at the 2nd ADJ Barasat Court.last_img read more

The LowTech Hack Youre Not Prepared For

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » This story appears in the September 2016 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. We’re inundated with terrifying tales of computer hacking. But seldom discussed is the relatively low-tech act of visual hacking: That’s when a snoop sneaks a peek at or photographs your sensitive information. In a Ponemon Institute experiment conducted on behalf of 3M and the Visual Privacy Advisory Council, an undercover hacker posing as a contractor or part-time worker was able to obtain sensitive info (like log-in credentials) 88 percent of the time. Related: Cyber Security a Growing Issue for Small BusinessHeighten awareness: In the Ponemon Institute study, employees did nothing to stop the undercover operative 70 percent of the time. Be sure to inform your staff of the risks of visual hacking, and have them memorize “the three Rs”: 1. Refrain from sharing key customer or business information with others. 2. Remove such information from business forms and documents where possible. 3. Redact the sensitive information that cannot be removed.Reduce vulnerability: Identify places where confidential materials are stored, such as workstations, printer and fax areas or conference room whiteboards. The more public the workspace, the more tightly you’ll want to lock it down. Place shredders or secured waste containers where only authorized personnel can access them. Keep documents out of plain sight by using printers with a “locked print” option (which requires passcode entry upon pickup) and instituting a clean-desk policy.Related: 10 Questions to Ask When Creating a Cybersecurity Plan for Your BusinessProtect your screens: This is going to sound paranoid, but Burks says it’s for real: If you have computer screens in public areas, position them in a way that makes them hard to snoop on, and use password-­protected screensavers. Privacy filters (films that block side views of your screen) are your friend, especially on laptops or smartphones that employees use outside the office. And consider where visual hacking and computer hacking can intersect: Check that wi-fi security cameras aren’t aimed at confidential information and are protected by strong passwords.  2 min read September 22, 2016last_img read more