上海419论坛,上海龙凤419,爱上海 – Powered by Teri Savorn!

Tag Archive: 贵族宝贝童装

East West Magazine Goes on Hiatus

first_imgMalik was named to the 2007 FOLIO: 40 list of influential people in the magazine industry. She launched East West as an online-only magazine in 2003. After eight online “issues,” the brand had attracted enough readers and advertisers to launch in print. “Crafting what EastWest means to our readers, which has changed over the years, has been the biggest challenge,” Malik told FOLIO: at the time, “but I think we’re finally in our groove.” In an e-mail to FOLIO:, Malik explained that the blog is a “a stop-gap to keep the brand alive.” “We need an investor that believes in our mission as strongly as we do,” she wrote. “The operation has run since 2003 on a shoestring, primarily self-funded … we could never invest in that growth to make it efficient and to take advantage of the momentum we had built.” East West magazine—a bi-monthly geared toward Asian Americans and focused on the intersection of Eastern and Western cultures—is going on an indefinite print hiatus effective immediately. “It is the tale of a small, bare bones company that has grown too fast,” founder Anita Malik wrote in a letter posted on the magazine’s Web site. “Our resources have been taxed and this labor of love has become larger than our small staff.” Malik hopes to be back in print by late 2008 or early 2009 but she “can’t say for sure.” In the meantime, East West will launch a blog to keep readers “updated on East West names, faces, places and events.” last_img read more

2018 A year of creepy AF smart home headlines

first_img See All Google’s efforts were impressive, but Duplex didn’t sit right with all of us. “In this age of disinformation, where fake news thrives and the public has trust issues with technology, Google designed a machine that can deceive humans,” wrote CNET’s Bridget Carey, who also voiced concerns over the fact that Google’s Assistant never identified itself as a robot. “Gosh, what could go wrong?”Two days after that editorial, Google told CNET explicitly that it will launch Duplex with “disclosure built-in” for better transparency.An Amazon Key in-home delivery: not as creepy as we expected! Tyler Lizenby/CNET Then there’s Amazon Key, which looks to leverage smart lock tech at your front door to let delivery people drop Amazon packages off inside your home. The Amazon Key Home Kit even includes an Amazon Cloud Cam to let you watch the delivery in real time right from your phone (more on cameras in just a bit, by the way).The idea of granting a stranger authorized access to your home was unnerving for many of us — but in the end, Amazon Key wasn’t nearly as creepy as we expected. In fact, the most we ever saw of the delivery people was an arm reaching inside the cracked door to drop a package off just inside. From Megan Wollerton’s recap:”While I started out hesitant about in-home delivery, I’d be comfortable enough to use it going forward (and to recommend it to frequent Amazon customers) — as long as I can keep an eye on whoever’s delivering the packages from my phone.”Camera creep2018 might be the year when the mainstream smart home opened its eyes, with a flood of new camera-equipped products and services designed to help us keep watch over our homes or stay in touch with loved ones. Early in the year, for instance, Amazon bought the home security startup Ring and its popular video doorbell. Now, a new app for Ring users called Neighbors lets you share, view and comment on local crime activity, complete with video clips from Ring cameras and doorbells in your community.The Nest Hello video doorbell is one of a growing number of smart home products using cameras equipped with facial-recognition technology. Chris Monroe/CNET That’s an appealing pitch to some, but consider the company’s recent patent applications focused on facial recognition. Each considers ways to use Ring cameras to identify “suspicious” people (convicted felons, sex offenders, etc.), then automatically alert law enforcement. That raised fresh surveillance state concerns from the American Civil Liberties Union.”Amazon is dreaming of a dangerous future,” the ACLU’s Jacob Snow said in a statement, “with its technology at the center of a massive decentralized surveillance network, running real-time facial recognition on members of the public using cameras installed in people’s doorbells.”We expect to see more uses of facial recognition technology in the coming year, including from cameras that are already equipped with the feature, like Google’s Nest Hello video doorbell. In other words, don’t expect this issue to fade from sight.And it’s not just the front door — from night-vision security cameras to connected baby monitors, people are parking cameras inside their homes, too. Doing so might require you to wrap your head around some potential privacy vulnerabilities. For instance, earlier this year, researchers from Kaspersky Lab warned that hackers could turn your own cameras against you by spying on you, or by fooling you with a duplicate, “cloned” feed. Your next vacation rental might have security cameras inside, too, which raises concerns about whether or not you could be filmed without realizing it during a weekend getaway.  That brings us to smart displays, a new smart home category that promises to bring even more cameras into people’s kitchens and living rooms. Amazon was first into the space with the Echo Show and Echo Spot, and Google soon followed suit with a suite of its own Google Assistant-powered touchscreens, including the Lenovo Smart Display and the JBL Link View. Tellingly, Google opted not to include a camera in its flagship, first-party smart display, the Google Home Hub.Of course, there’s another smart display worth mentioning. In fact, it gets the next section of this post all to itself.fl-portal-10 Chris Monroe/CNET Smart home hubris from FacebookThere was a collective “you’ve gotta be f***ing kidding me” from many of us who write about tech when Facebook, in the midst of scandal after scandal after scandal over the misuse of user data, unveiled the new Facebook Portal in-home video chatting devices. Because sure, why not let a transparency-challenged company that’s been — at best — wildly irresponsible with user data bring person-tracking cameras and always-listening microphones into your living room? They promise they’ll behave! Tags CNET Smart Home Aug 31 • The best coffee grinders you can buy right now More recently, a judge in New Hampshire ordered Amazon to hand over the Alexa audio of a user accused of two counts of first degree murder. For now, Amazon is fighting the ruling.”Amazon will not release customer information without a valid and binding legal demand properly served on us,” an Amazon spokesperson told CNET. “Amazon objects to overbroad or otherwise inappropriate demands as a matter of course.”   Concerns about silent, “ultrasonic” audio attacks also raised our collective assistant anxiety this year, with researchers claiming that the most popular voice platforms were vulnerable to audio cues at frequencies too high for humans to hear. Researchers at UC Berkeley claim they were even able to fool Mozilla’s open-source DeepSpeech voice-to-text engine by hiding ultrasonic audio cues within brief snippets of music.Maybe most disconcerting — to date, none of the major tech companies responsible for these voice platforms have denied that attacks like these are possible.google-duplex-orens-hummus-demo-2-2Enlarge ImageWith Google Duplex, Google Assistant will call restaurants and salons to make reservations on your behalf. Google’s demo was one of the most convincingly life-like AI use-cases we’d ever seen. James Martin/CNET Big moonshots, big questions2018 saw some notable new ideas about where smart home tech may be headed — and some of those ideas raised a lot of questions.Let’s start with Google Duplex, the search giant’s effort to let the artificially intelligent Google Assistant make phone calls on your behalf. Google touted the feature as a way for the Assistant to book things like haircuts and dinner reservations — and the demo was pretty mind-blowing. Watch for yourself below: 1 Consumer Product Safety Commission asks: How dangerous is the internet of things? Here’s what Congress wants to know about Amazon’s Echo Dot for kids Senators call on FTC to investigate smart TVs tracking viewers’ data Your smart air conditioner could help bring down the power grid, researchers say California governor signs country’s first IoT security law Comment Google’s Duplex: AI that makes you think you’re talking to a human Voice of concern: Smart assistants create new openings for hackers Watch Google Assistant fire a gun Robot or human? Google Assistant will leave you guessing And hey, amid escalating scrutiny, perhaps they will. “We have a responsibility to protect your data,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a March 21 statement following the company’s Cambridge Analytica data-mining scandal. “And if we can’t then we don’t deserve to serve you.”Just keep in mind that since then, Zuckerberg’s company has come under continued fire for not doing enough to deal with a flood of fake news and Russian trolls on its platform during the 2016 US election. In July of this year, the company admitted to sharing user information with hardware and software partners even after claiming to discontinue the practice in 2015. Just this week, the New York Times reported that Facebook used “special arrangements” like those even more than the company initially disclosed — namely, to give Microsoft’s Bing search engine access to the names of all Facebook users’ friends without consent, and to allow Netflix and Spotify to read Facebook users’ private messages.Netflix denies that it ever accessed people’s private messages on Facebook, or asked for the ability to do so. Spotify didn’t immediately return a request for comment.At any rate, we are well past the point of taking Facebook’s word for anything when it comes to protecting your private data. But, if early market indications showing lots of interest in smart displays this holiday buying season are correct, that’s exactly what some people might be doing. That, or they’ve been drawn in by Facebook’s admittedly slick user interface — enough so to shrug off some extremely valid privacy concerns.After the year we’ve had, maybe that’s what creeps me out the most. reading • 2018: A year of creepy AF smart home headlines Microphone mishaps (no laughing matter)Things typically get a bit quiet in tech during the months following January’s big CES expo in Las Vegas. This year, a mysterious and disconcerting bout of laughter echoed out of the silence.The cackle in question came from Alexa, when users of Amazon’s popular voice assistant began sharing clips of eerie, unprompted laughter emitting from their Echo devices. Once the phenomenon began to trend on Twitter, Amazon confirmed the issue and told us it was looking into a fix.2018 saw a number of stories about Echo devices acting strangely. Chris Monroe/CNET “In rare circumstances, Alexa can mistakenly hear the phrase ‘Alexa, laugh,'” the company ultimately explained. “We are changing that phrase to be ‘Alexa, can you laugh?’ which is less likely to have false positives, and we are disabling the short utterance ‘Alexa, laugh.’ We are also changing Alexa’s response from simply laughter to ‘Sure, I can laugh’ followed by laughter.”In another Alexa headache this May, a family in Oregon claimed that their Echo device recorded audio of a private conversation and sent it out to a random contact without warning. Amazon’s explanation? It was the Alexa equivalent of a butt-dial.”[The] Echo woke up due to a word in background conversation sounding like ‘Alexa,'” an Amazon spokesperson told CNET. “Then, the subsequent conversation was heard as a ‘send message’ request. At which point, Alexa said out loud, ‘To whom?’ At which point, the background conversation was interpreted as a name in the customer’s contact list. Alexa then asked out loud, ‘[contact name], right?’ Alexa then interpreted background conversation as ‘right.'””As unlikely as this string of events is, we are evaluating options to make this case even less likely,” Amazon added.Still, accidents happen. Just today, Reuters reports that Amazon mistakenly sent the wrong files to an Alexa user in Germany who had requested his Echo recordings. As a result, he was able to download and access 1,700 recordings from another user’s household. Per Reuters, Amazon called this an isolated incident, and the result of human error.Assistant anxietyAmazon also found itself navigating potential legal battles over user privacy when Alexa became an apparent witness to not one, but two separate cases of homicide. The first came to a conclusion in March when Amazon agreed to hand over the Alexa audio recordings of a user in Bentonville, Arkansas, who stood accused of of first-degree murder, but only after that user consented to the release. Aug 31 • Alexa can tell you if someone breaks into your house 2018 is just about over, and it’s common for tech reporters to dig back into their beats to try and sum up the year’s news. And, as the CNET Smart Home team took a look back for our own year in review, there was one takeaway we just couldn’t escape:The smart home was… kinda creepy this year.To wit, there were evil cackles from Alexa, fake phone calls from Google Assistant, and concerns a-plenty about the connected cameras and microphones filling our homes. That’s not to mention the well-founded fears about the mass amount of data that these devices are asking to be trusted with (looking right at you, Facebook Portal. No thanks.)So, yeah, if the smart home had you a bit creeped out in 2018, I can’t say I blame you. Here’s a look back at the stories that probably played a role. Tough questions for the smart home in 2018 So Alexa decided to laugh randomly while I was in the kitchen. Freaked @SnootyJuicer and I out. I thought a kid was laughing behind me. pic.twitter.com/6dblzkiQHp— CaptHandlebar (@CaptHandlebar) February 23, 2018 Aug 30 • Battling bot vacs: iRobot Roomba S9+ vs Neato Botvac D7 Connected 4:25 Aug 31 • Best smart light bulbs for 2019 (plus switches, light strips, accessories and more) Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice 2018 in creepy assistants CNET Smart Home • Smart Homelast_img read more

Review Biometrics Technologies Measure Up Part 13

first_imgBiometric door lock – uses your fingerprint to open – runs off batteries and has key for emergencies Inexpensive print reader for PC security – comes with software – connects to computer via USB port The second most popular device, which has actually been on the market and in use longer, is the hand reader. This device works by measuring the dimensions of your hand – normally the fingers.Everybody has different length fingers. Even if you do run into someone with similar finger length, the combination of various finger lengths essentially eliminates the possibility of false identification. For example: your index finger might be the exact same length as somebody else’s, but the chances that 2 of more of your fingers are the same length are vanishingly small.Backlighting and lasers were used in early models but now electrical conduction is the method of choice to measure fingers – fewer technical problems, lower power requirements.It works by measuring the electrical conduction of your hand. The user places his or her hand on a metal or plastic plate with two or more studs protruding for finger alignment. A second later the device detects a small current at the point where the hand touches the plate. It then measures these areas and compares the findings to an internal database. Unlike fingerprint scanners, hand readers do not require a computer – needed processing is done internally – although some can be connected to a computer for time clock applications via a standard network connection or serial cable.Most units also have a keypad for entering in user data and ID numbers. Available models can store from 50 to over 500 individual hand measurements.This technology also presents some false positives from time to time when users fail to correctly locate their hand on the scanner plate. Many require the keying of an ID code to make identification 100% positive.These units tend to be very robust and ideal for users with dirty or worn hands like factories and assembly plants. Their self-contained nature means they can be installed virtually anywhere.To Be Continued … (in part 2: Eye Scanners, Face Recognition, and Pattern Recognition) Copyright 2005 PhysOrg.com Like any relatively new technology there are problems: Finger prints can be covered by callus or worn smooth from heavy use -dirt can get into the print lines and skin can peel – all making print reading more difficult. Some users have problems with less expensive models due to the lack of a well defined center whorl in the middle – something the device needs to find the center and build a code for the print. Since prints are converted to number codes it’s possible for two prints to have the same code. This means each device is limited as to the number of prints it can read without giving a false positive. More money usually gets you models that manage more prints.A new technology that scans the subsurface of your fingerprint – down five skin layers deep – works even when the print is scuffed or dirty. This technology is still new, however, so most fingerprint scanner systems also require a code or PIN of some type to for 100% positive identification.Some fingerprint readers and their applications: Print reader with magnetic card reader for extra security.Hand Scanners The basic reason is simple: biometrics uses body measurements to make positive personal identification without resorting to ID cards, passwords, PINs and other problematic security technologies. Your ID is your body – or a part of it, anyway. This makes ID counterfeiting much more difficult and also insures that ID doesn’t get left behind – short or a very serious mishap, that is.Various technologies have been used over the years and favorites are slowly emerging – along with a host of ethical and privacy issues.Finger Print ScannersThe most common technology in use today by far is fingerprint scanning. This technology is used everywhere from top secret military installations to supermarkets, cell phones and time clocks.Police departments have long used finger prints to track criminals because of their uniqueness – each finger print is different – making positive identification possible for any given individual. Finger print readers use this uniqueness to generate a code – rarely do they actually use the full print for identification – based on areas where line print lines merge, fork or loop – like the round “whorl” you can find in the middle of all finger prints.These devices work by scanning the print with a light source – either a laser or, more commonly, a LED (Light Emitting Diode) – on to a chip. The chip is either a CCD (Charged Couple Device – the same found in digital cameras) or the less expensive CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). Integrated circuits then generate the code to identify the print.This code is stored in a database – either in a remote computer for cheaper USB models or in the device itself. When a person scans a print, this device compares the code generated by the print with one in the database to make a positive identification. These “print coding” algorithms are closely guarded secrets.Price is probably the most attractive reason to use this technology. Securing your computer with a fingerprint reading mouse cost less than $100. Time clock systems start at around $500. This makes finger print scanning one of the most affordable of all the biometrics technologies. Explore furthercenter_img Pairing targeted drugs for breast and lung cancer could overcome treatment resistance (Part 1/3) Biometrics technologies have come a long way from a slow start in the early 80s. Now they can be found almost anywhere and soon, almost everywhere. Biometric time and attendance system – works without a connection to a computer Citation: Review: Biometrics Technologies Measure Up (Part 1/3) (2005, November 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2005-11-biometrics-technologies.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Lata Mangeshkars emotional twitter tribute to R D Burman

first_img“Aaj Pancham yaane R D Burman ki 21vi punyatithi hai (Today is the 21st death anniversary of Pancham alias R D Burman). Aisa guni kalakar sadiyo’n me ek paida hota hai, wo gaane compose bhi karta tha aur khud bhi accha gaata tha (Such talented artist is born once in ages, he used to compose songs and was also a very good singer),” she tweeted. “Gaano’n mein naye naye prayog karna usko bohot pasand tha (He loved to try new experiments and techniques while composing songs). Aise kalakar ko meri bhavpurna shraddhanjali (I pay a sincere tribute to him),” she added.The 85-year-old collaborated with Burman on several hit songs like Aaja piya tohe pyar doon, Raina beeti jaye and Tune o rangeele.Mangeshkar also shared links of her favourite Burman-composed songs Tere bina jiya jaye na and Bahon mein chale aao. R.D. Burman died at the age of 54 on January 4, 1994.last_img read more

Son hacks mother to death in W Midnapore

first_imgKolkata: A person from West Midnapore district allegedly hacked his mother to death following an altercation on Wednesday, police said. “Gorachand Murmu, a resident of West Midnapore district’s Goaltore allegedly killed his mother Hiramoni Murmu (55) by repeatedly striking her with an axe on Wednesday morning. He has been arrested,” an officer from Goaltore police station said. According to the neighbours, Murmu attacked his mother following a heated exchange of words and later locked himself up inside a room along with the dead body. “The neighbours heard some loud noise and broke into the house to find the woman’s body in a pool of blood. They caught Murmu and informed the police,” the officer said. “The body has been sent for autopsy. The accused will be produced in court on Thursday,” he added.last_img read more

The New Era of IM

first_img This story appears in the May 2009 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » April 10, 2009 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Instant messaging has come a long way since the days of in-network AIM chatting. Check out these new features that make IM a fully featured business tool. Enroll Now for Free IM-to-textSkype isn’t the only big player in computer-to-phone communications anymore–and it isn’t always the cheapest, either. AIM, Google, Windows Live Messenger and Yahoo have added SMS support, so you can text your colleagues for free.Multimedia messagingPlenty of IM apps now offer multimedia voice and video chat, like AIM, Google Chat and Yahoo Messenger. Many more offer instant file sharing, and some even let you do a screen share, like Apple’s iChat and Skype 2.8, which is great for troubleshooting.Embedded conversationsInstead of downloading a desktop app, a lot of IM clients let you chat right in the web page you’re using. Google Chat works across many of your Google pages, from Gmail to iGoogle. And Facebook and MySpace’s IM apps work anywhere within their respective sites.IM aggregatorsIf you have multiple IM accounts, you can use an app that’ll get your contacts in one place. Top players are web app Meebo, desktop apps Adium and Digsby, and mobile and multiplatform apps Palringo and eBuddy. The only problem is you may not get the full video, audio or texting functions available on your individual accounts.center_img 1.  The situation: A client asks you to write a LinkedIn recommendation, but you have nothing nice to say.What to do: Hit the “Archive” button. Don’t write a referral you can’t stand by. 2.  The situation: Your intern adds you on Facebook.What to do: Use your privacy settings–if you don’t want him seeing all your activity, give him a limited view.3. The situation: A colleague confronts you for dropping her as a “friend.”What to do: Pre-empt the situation by “un-friending” sparingly-you don’t want to lose business over pruning your network.4.  The situation: You get an uncouth comment.What to do: Delete! If it’s a minor offense, call the person out on it. If it’s major, cut him out of your network. 5. The situation: An employee is annoying you with inane updates on Facebook.What to do: No need to un-friend–just set your newsfeed options to see less about that employee.6. The situation: An associate posts and tags a less-than-classy photo of you.What to do: “Un-tag,” if possible, then ask the associate to take the photo down. 3 min read Read the writing on the wall Handle these sticky social networking situations with a careful click of your mouse. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowlast_img read more