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Monthly Archive: June 2021

Army ready to take on the world

first_imgRoyal Navy – Greg Barden was amazing at seven, and the locks, Stu McLaren and Marsh Cormack, were prominent before the Navy were worn down in the second half. The centre pairing of Dale Sleeman and Calum Macrea (the Navy’s try-scorer) combined well but like the team as a whole they were mainly on the back foot. Apolosi Satala, a talisman of Army rugby, scored two tries to help sink the NavyROLL ON the Defence Rugby Cup. That’s the message from the British Army after they ran the Royal Navy ragged, 44-10, to regain the Babcock Trophy in front of a 62,790 Twickenham crowd, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey.The inaugural Defence Rugby Cup is being held in Australia and New Zealand in October and on Saturday’s evidence the British Army should have a real shot at winning it – dependent on player availability of course.It’s impossible to overstate the influence of their Fijian soldiers, who comprise half the team. Between them they scored all seven tries – three by right-wing Ben Seru, two by Apo Satala, one by left-wing Gus Qasevakatini and one by fly-half Jack Prasad. When the sun was out and the game was loose, it was like watching a sevens tournament in Suva.“We have quite a few Fijians and Welshies and they like to throw the ball around,” says Army coach Andy Sanger. “The Navy tore into us at the start and we were a bit shellshocked, but at half-time I had a few choice words and reminded them what the Army jersey is about.”Sanger identified three areas for improvement after last year’s shock defeat: contact, rugby conditioning and complacency. He was able to tick all three boxes. Despite the heroics of Navy openside Greg Barden, the Army forced several turnovers in the last hour as the force of their hits told.One of these led to Prasad’s try which gave the Army a 12-10 half-time lead. Whereas last year the Navy finished the stronger, this time the Army’s second-half onslaught took its toll. And nor did the Army show any mercy as they chalked up their ninth win in the fixture in the past ten years. They now have three days of conditioning tests in both July and August before heading Down Under to take on the best combined forces teams from around the world.The Royal Navy will also be competing but outgoing coach Geraint Ashton Jones, who has now passed the reins to Andy Kellett, points out that the team is likely to be weaker – rugby takes a back seat to the players’ main role as armed forces personnel.They were gutsy to the end and will be back to fight another day, but they’re going to need to keep the game more structured to have a chance in 2012.Players of note:British Army – Bola Boladau and Apo Satala were immense in the back row, and second-row Ben Hughes – winning his 32nd Army cap – keeps delivering. Jack Prasad was instrumental in several of the tries and on the wing Ben Seru had a field day against Scott Llewellyn, who was filling in for the injured Josh Drauniniu.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Quins Season Ticket sales look to break records!

first_imgWith Season Tickets starting from £149 for Adults and £99 for Under 21s, we believe that this represents great value for money. As a Harlequins Season Ticket Holder you shall receive: –– 10 Aviva Premiership matches– 3 Heineken Cup matches– 2 LV Cup matches– 2 Friendlies– a ticket for the J P Morgan Premiership 7s Final – which Harlequins are hosting this year– a ticket for The LV=Big Game 4 at Twickenham Stadium on Tuesday 27th December, plus much more! CARDIFF, WALES – MAY 20: Chris Robshaw, the Harlequins captain raises the trophy after their victory during the Amlin Cup final between Harlequins and Stade Francais at the Cardiff City Stadium held on May 20, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Harlequins – The Amlin Challenge Cup Winners 2011With the Season Ticket renewal deadline passing, Harlequins are delighted to announce that Season Ticket sales are up 24% at the same time last season!Season Tickets are now on General Sale as the Renewal period ends and with added Heineken Cup, why would you not want a Season Ticket?Jon Salinger (Ticketing Manager) said ‘Last season we had nearly 7,000 Season Ticket holders, which was a record and if sales continue as they are we should surpass 7,000, then we may have the highest ever number of Season Ticket holders at Harlequins in their history’Following the win in the Amlin Challenge Cup against Stade Francais on Friday 20th May, and the subsequent qualification to the Heineken Cup everyone wants to be a part of the club and support this young, exciting squad for the 2011-2012 Season. Season Tickets can be purchased by contacting the Harlequins Ticket Office on 0871 527 1315 during office hours, in Person at the Stoop and even online at www.quinsru.talent-sport.co.uk – please note that the Ticket Office will be open on Saturday 2nd June for telephone callers from 10.30am till 1pm.For more information on Season Tickets visit the Harlequins website and view the Season Ticket brochure under the Ticketing section.last_img read more

July’s what’s hot and what’s not

first_imgWe are the champions! Queensland Reds celebrate their Super Rugby winBy Rugby World reader Larissa FallsHOTQueensland Reds… Super Rugby champions!Samoa… For their incredible 32-23 win over Australia and their first victory over a top-five international team. The question is: will teams start to play against them more regularly though?Otago… Beat Auckland at Eden Park for the first time in 35 years in the ITM Cup.Tri-Nations… Will Genia’s decision-making, Dan Carter’s point’s record and Morne Steyn’s 39 consecutive successful goal kicks. Support play, offloading and counter-attacking.Japan… Lifted their first ever IRB Pacific Nations Cup. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England Women… The U20s triumphed in the Nations Cup after an undefeated season, while the senior side were crowned European Sevens champions.Scottish Rugby… For announcing their first full-time professional Sevens squadNOTScheduling… Disgraceful that Australia have only played Samoa five times… and I’m sure it’s similar for other international teams too!Complainers… England apparently shouldn’t be allowed a black change strip, yet New Zealand’s change strip is what colour… white!center_img RFU… Even more madness and mayhem, sackings and squabbles.Illness… The thoughts and prays of everyone in world rugby go out to Joost van der Westhuizen and his family.last_img read more

September Bargain Buys

LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The adiZero RS7 boots have been seen on players all over the world. Get yours for £89.99 (RRP £139.99) from prodirectrugby.comThis adidas jersey is now a snip at only £14.99, down from £39.99, from rugbystore.co.uk When times are tough a bargain or two is just what you need to beat the financial blues. So Rugby World is coming to the rescue but scouring the web for some great bargains. This month we have swooped on three bargains – that we recommend – from rugbystore.co.uk, prodirectrugby.co.uk and lovell-rugby.co.uk. Grab them while they are still available!A variety of beach rugby tops are now being sold for just £34.99 (RRP £49.99) from lovell-rugby.co.uk read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgFine finishesThere was plenty for Sale to be happy about in their 34-30 win over Leicester Tigers as they took advantage of some porous defence by the visitors and scored four tries. Mike Phillips got the ball rolling with a fine individual effort, then teenage wing Paolo Odogwu sprinted over after Josh Beaumont had taken possession at the back of a lineout.However the try of this Aviva Premiership match was scored by Leicester wing Adam Thompstone. Receiving the ball on the right, he was tackled by Odogwu from one side and Byron McGuigan from the other but somehow, as they dragged him into touch in the corner, he reached his arm between their bodies and touched the ball down. With Leicester trailing 31-23 at the time, even after Owen Williams’ excellent conversion it wasn’t enough to snatch the win for the Tigers, but the try did at least earn them a losing bonus point. TAGS: Wasps Double troubleReferee Dudley Phillips joins the players in the doghouse this week after awarding a try to Leinster despite a clear double-movement from scorer Rhys Ruddock – and as the match ended up as a 16-13 win for the Irish side against Cardiff Blues, it was a crucial mistake.Ruddock was dragged up to the line but clearly grounded the ball short to start with then, a couple of seconds later, moved it forward. Phillips opted not to use the television match official, but if he had done the try would surely have been disallowed.Josh Navidi did the Blues no favours when he conceded the penalty which ultimately gave Leinster their win. Running back from an offside position he got in the way of a pass by scrum-half Jamison Gibson-Park. It was cute play by the number nine but Navidi shouldn’t have been there. The SaintsYoung and giftedSeven tries from seven different scorers and a 47-18 win over Harlequins – be in no doubt, Wasps are the team to watch at the moment.It is impossible to pick out individual Saints from among the Wasps players after their fifth win from five Aviva Premiership matches this season, so instead it is hats off to their boss Dai Young. He has put together a multi-talented squad and got them playing stunning rugby. Next weekend their title credentials will get the sternest of tests at they travel to take on champions Saracens, but Wasps will go into the match on a hot streak of form with nothing to fear and Saracens will be wary of being stung.Munster also scored seven tries this weekend, with CJ Stander grabbing two, as they cruised to a 49-5 win over Zebre in the Guinness Pro12. Glasgow were trailing 17-16 when Allan received the ball outside the 22. He looked up, saw a hint of a gap between two forwards, dummied, stepped and broke the line and from there it was a straight run and slide over the whitewash. One to treasure for the prop, and one which won’t need exaggerating when he re-tells the story in months to come! The SinnersLeaky LeicesterLeicester‘s loss at Sale Sharks was the third time this season they have conceded more than 30 points. This time the main problem seemed to be around the breakdown, as first they left a gap for Mike Phillips to charge through to open the scoring, then Johnny Leota smashed through on the half-hour before Halani ’Aulika barged his way over the line to give Sale a decent lead going into the last quarter. Richard Cockerill will be demanding an improvement from Leicester when they host Worcester next weekend. Payne’s effort not in vain Jared Payne helped Ulster scrape to a 9-7 home win over the Ospreys with a critical try-saving tackle on Eli Walker and in doing so enabled his team to maintain their 100% start to the season in the Guinness Pro12.The Welsh wing chased a kick from Rhys Webb up the left wing and beat Payne to the bouncing ball, but the Ulster centre didn’t panic and he brought Walker down, then spun around as he slid along the turf and forced Walker away from the try-line and into touch.Ulster were trailing 7-6 at the time so if Walker had scored, the Welsh side might have gone on to see out the game. As it was, Ulster forced a last-minute penalty and Paddy Jackson kicked it to steal the victory for the home side. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The Young One: Wasps fans have a lot to thank Dai Young for. (Photo: Getty Images) North and Picamoles get the Saints marchingNorthampton went in to Friday’s match against Exeter Chiefs searching for their first home win of the season and managed to scrape by 20-19 thanks to some heroics from several players.It didn’t look very promising for the Saints when they were trailing 13-0 in the first half, but Louis Picamoles – who had a terrific game – powered into the Chiefs’ 22 and helped create the chance for George North to power over in the corner.Just a minute later, North caught the re-start kick deep in his own 22 and set off on a swerving run, cutting inside then out and making 50 metres of ground before passing to Nic Groom, who shipped the ball on to Rory Hutchinson to score a try on debut.Roar for Rory: Northampton’s replacements are pleased with Hutchinson’s try. (Photo: Getty Images)The young centre hadn’t even been expecting to play and was only in the side because Harry Mallinder had to move from centre to fly-half to replace Stephen Myler on the eve of the game. And Mallinder played a key role as he stepped up and kicked a penalty when Northampton were trailing 19-17 with two minutes of the match remaining.Picamoles, whose breaks and offloads had been mesmerising throughout the game, had the final say, booting the ball into touch when the clock had gone red to secure the narrowest of wins. Thanks, but no thanks Sinoti Sinoti might owe Dominic Waldouck a pint when his foolish and low long pass left the centre stooping to collect the ball and the on-rushing Jackson Willison in the same instant. Willison claimed the ball and both he and Waldouck were left in a heap on the floor as Tom Heathcote took it on and raced towards the line, then put Wynand Olivier in for the try. That gave Worcester Warriors a 5-0 lead and they went on to beat Newcastle 11-9 and claim their first Premiership win since March.Try time: Anthony Watson heads for home with Burns in his wake. (Photo: Getty Images)Inglorious GloucesterAlmost the entire Gloucester team could be Sinners this week after their third home defeat of the season, at turgid 15-6 loss West Country rivals Bath. They were errors all over the place but the game turned on a lost lineout midway through the second half. Gloucester were 6-3 up and had just repelled a sustained Bath attack, earning a penalty with which to clear their lines. However, from the lineout on halfway they lost possession and Bath put them back under pressure and created the decisive try for Anthony Watson from there, with the wing brushing off a tackle from Billy Burns too easily.Late in the game Gloucester had the chance to at least snatch a losing bonus point from a dire match but when they were awarded a kickable penalty Willi Heinz foolishly decided to tap and go, in search of a try which would not, by then, have been enough to win the game. Gloucester could not cross the whitewash and were left to rue their many errors. In full flight: Alex Allan on his way to the try-line at Rodney Parade. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)A try to treasureProps just love to score tries from 25-metre breaks, with a jink or a side-step to take them past the grasping hands of beaten defenders. Unfortunately, this rarely happens, and the big men wearing the small numbers are more likely to flop over the line from two paces.However, Glasgow Warriors’ No 1 Alex Allan scored a try to be proud of on Friday and helped his team beat the Newport Gwent Dragons 26-17 at Rodney Parade. Some stunning games lit up round five of the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 seasons, but there were some turgid tussles as well. New look: Palma-Newport’s beard and its tiny pigtail. (Photo: Getty Images)Weird beardEver met a man with a pigtail in his beard? Bath prop Kane Palma-Newport has decided the way to tame his copious facial hair is to capture some of it in a tiny pony-tail. However, it doesn’t really make much difference to the volume of his beard and, as the BT Sport commentators said during Saturday’s match at Gloucester, it is just asking to be pulled.last_img read more

Agustin Pichot Appointed To Board Of Directors At USA Rugby

first_img Expand The United States recently hosted the Sevens World Cup in San Francisco and it proved to be an enormous success as it set several records for its coverage. NBC Sports’ Rugby Sevens World Cup Coverage Sets Records Mario Ledesma unveiled as new Argentina coach NBC Sports’ Rugby Sevens World Cup Coverage Sets Records See the Pumas squad new coach Mario Ledesma… Collapse The Argentinian rugby legend has become the World Rugby representative for the USA Rugby board. At the recent Sevens World Cup, NBC Sports… He means business: World Rugby vice-chairman Agustin Pichot Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for all the latest rugby news. Mario Ledesma unveiled as new Argentina coach Agustin Pichot Appointed To Board Of Directors At USA RugbyUSA Rugby recently announced the appointment of Agustin Pichot as World Rugby’s representative on the board.“Welcoming Agustín to USA Rugby is an incredible step forward for American rugby,” said USA Rugby Chair, Barbara O’Brien. “He has a first-hand understanding for the development of rugby and after a storied playing career, owns a genuine passion for the advancement of the game.”One of his responsibilities in his new role will be to try and expand the game in the United States. Currently their are approximately 33 million rugby fans in the US and the board have ambitious plans to grow that number in the future. Pichot will also help govern the union there and look at restructuring the financial side of the sport too. Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Argentina Rugby Championship Squad General: Pichot guided his Argentina team to a third-place at the 2007 World Cup (Getty Images)An Argentinian rugby legend, Pichot played in three World Cups and is in the World Rugby Hall of Fame. When asked to comment, he said: “I am excited to be joining the USA Rugby board as World Rugby’s representative. Collectively, we are focused on making USA Rugby the best it possibly can be, providing foundations for sustainable participation, fan and commercial growth within one of the world’s most competitive and rewarding sports and entertainment markets.”“As the World Rugby representative on the board, I look forward to sharing my knowledge and providing access to World Rugby’s technical, development and governance expertise to provide the best-possible opportunity to the USA and cement its place as a major player in global rugby.” Frankie Deges reports on the latest from Argentina… Argentina Rugby Championship Squadlast_img read more

Best Rugby Books 2020

first_imgBUY NOW from AmazonFacing the Haka, published by Allen & Unwin NZMany love it, some despise it – the haka always gets people animated. This beautifully presented book, published in partnership with NZ Rugby, explains one of sport’s most famous rituals from the perspective of those who have performed it or stared it down. “It’s an amazing experience,” says Manu Tuilagi. “It gets you pumped up watching them do it.”BUY NOW from AmazonRory Best: My Autobiography, published by Hodder & StoughtonThe “shy, fat lad” come good. Rory Best didn’t get the fairytale ending to his Ireland career that he sought at Japan 2019 but what a contribution – 124 caps, 38 of them as captain, across 14 largely successful years. His gripping autobiography was one of 2020’s earlier offerings and charts the chequered fortunes of a player who quit the booze to become an Irish great.Read a full review of Rory Best’s book here.BUY NOW from AmazonMud, Maul, Mascara, published by UnboundAs the women’s game grows in standards and profile, a happy byproduct is books such as this. Catherine Spencer, who captained England to three Six Nations titles, talks about the glory years and the mental struggles she faced both as an elite athlete and a woman living an everyday life. There are a few shots fired in the RFU’s direction too.BUY NOW from AmazonSaving Rugby Union, published by Y LolfaWhy did they change our game?, The Sorry Saga of the Crooked Scrum Feed and Farewell, Common Sense – three of the chapter headings that tell you where this book is going. Ross Reyburn delivers a damning verdict on the way rugby union has been run in the professional era and details the issues he believes require urgent solutions.BUY NOW from AmazonRunning the Race, published by Christian FocusA biography of the Scotland wing famous for winning gold at the 1924 Olympics. A Christian missionary, Eric Liddell chose to run in the 400m instead of the 100m so he didn’t have to run on a Sunday. Author John W Keddie was an adviser on the epic film Chariots of Fire and his book delves into Liddell’s sporting achievements and the faith that pushed him to excel.BUY NOW from AmazonRugby Behind Barbed Wire, published by AmberleyFifty years on, Chris Schoeman explores the Springboks’ controversial 1969-70 tour of Britain and Ireland. Played to a backdrop of heightened political tension because of apartheid, the tourists were besieged amid a series of violent demonstrations. Smoke bombs and flour bombs were a regular match-day occurrence. Many of those involved are interviewed.BUY NOW from AmazonPuddings, Bullies & Squashes, published by Sunnyrest BooksBritain is where its two principal football codes were given shape and discipline. The cradle for this was the 19th century public schools and Malcolm Tozer tells the story of 20 of those schools and their versions of the game. The book conveys the variety of those early codes before the nationalisation of the game by the FA from 1863 and the RFU from 1871.BUY NOW from AmazonA Few Wise Words, published by AmershamNot a rugby book but included here because of a contribution from Sir Clive Woodward. Compiled by Peter Mukherjee, it features 22 stories of success and inspirational advice by the likes of Stephen Fry, Joanna Lumley and Sir Ben Ainslie. “I never lose – I either win or I learn,” says ex-England coach Woodward in a volume as apt as ever during uncertain times.BUY NOW from AmazonBehind The Silver Fern, published by PolarisA new edition of Polaris’s player-told All Blacks history, compiled by Tony Johnson and Lynn McConnell. The original version came out to great acclaim in 2017. Discover who faced Australia with his arm in a sling, who withdrew from a Test side because no one would milk his cows and who kicked down the Gnoll’s changing-room door. A riveting read.BUY NOW from AmazonUnholy Union, published by ConstableAuthor Michael Aylwin, in collaboration with consultant Mark Evans, released this fascinating in-depth analysis of our sport last year – the hardback cover is pictured. The paperback edition, updated and with a new prologue, followed recently and is as searingly relevant one year on. “The rugby universe now fits in your pocket!” says Aylwin.BUY NOW from AmazonThe Grudge, published by PolarisHow time flies – this award-winning masterpiece by Tom English first came out more than ten years ago. It stands the test of time, exploring the spite and sniping surrounding Scotland’s famous Grand Slam win against England in 1990. If you missed it first time around, get your hands on this 30th anniversary updated edition.Read a full review of The Grudge here.BUY NOW from AmazonSamson Rising, published by United WritersThe inspirational story of John Hambly, a grass-roots player from Cornwall and later captain of London side Actonians. After contracting MS, he created the Samson Centre in Guildford for sufferers of this terrible disease. Dylan Hartley pens the foreword and pays warm tribute to Hambly, who won a Sport Give Back award. £1 from every sale goes to the centre.Read a full review of Samson Rising here. BUY NOW from AmazonIf you’re looking for a new pair of rugby boots or a replica shirt, check out our buyers’ guides for the best rugby kit. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Take your pick: a few of the excellent rugby books that were published during 2020 (Imogen Pearey) Best Rugby Books 2020Star-name autobiographies perennially feature heavily in rugby publishing and there have been some crackers of late. But there’s a feast of other material available: histories, critiques, hard men and the haka. You have the poignancy of serious injury and the purity of children’s adventures, real life and fiction side by side. Here are the best rugby books of 2020…Best Rugby Books 2020Joe Marler: Loose Head, published by Ebury PressJust like a rugby ball, you never know which way you’ll bounce. So says the England prop whose colourful career is reflected in this rollicking book covering everything from rituals to red mist, nudity to nicknames. Ghostwriter Rachel Murphy unravels the complex character that is Marler, a player who twice retired from Test rugby and twice changed his mind.BUY NOW from AmazonExe Men, published by PolarisWith immaculate timing comes the definitive history of Exeter Chiefs. Just how did they turn from cliquey meanderers in the mid-1980s to widely loved European champions in 2020? Rob Kitson boards the bus to guide us through their hightailed journey, providing fascinating biogs of key men like Tony Rowe and Rob Baxter. It won’t just be Chiefs fans who lap this up.Read a full review of Exe Men here.BUY NOW from AmazonJames Haskell: What a Flanker, published by HarperCollins“There are a few basic rules to live by as a rugby player,” says the ex-England flanker. “Never trust a team-mate who doesn’t attend team socials, never trust a team-mate who doesn’t front up in a contact session, and never trust a man who showers with his pants on.” Lots of laughs amid the serious stuff from a player who could never be accused of being vanilla.Read a full review of What a Flanker here.BUY NOW from AmazonOur Blood is Green, published by PolarisThe latest instalment from Polaris’s hugely popular history series on international teams. This tells the story of the Springboks in their own words – “We represent something much bigger than we can imagine,” says current captain Siya Kolisi. Dedicated to the late James Small, who was interviewed for the book, and to South African players across the decades. BUY NOW from AmazonJames Hook: Kick-Off, published by PolarisWelsh international James Hook, a father of three, turns his hand to children’s fiction with terrific effect. His debut novel follows a season in the life of primary school youngster Jimmy Joseph and his rugby-mad friends. Be prepared for some villainous behaviour – but will Jimmy overcome such obstacles as he chases his dream? Book one of a series.BUY NOW from AmazonRob Kearney: No Hiding, published by Reach SportA fascinating portrait of one of Irish rugby’s most decorated players – the full-back won two Grand Slams with Ireland, four Heineken European Cups with Leinster and toured twice with the Lions. Kearney’s career didn’t always run smoothly as ghostwriter David Walsh relates. A powerful autobiography that provides insights into the man behind the legend.Read a full review of No Hiding here.BUY NOW from AmazonDylan Hartley: The Hurt, published by VikingThere will be plenty of memoirs to come that focus on the physical and psychological demands on Test players – but few as beautifully written as Hartley’s collaboration with Michael Calvin. The ex-England captain’s autobiography shows us the sport warts and all. “Rugby is great for the soul but terrible for the body,” says the 97-times capped hooker.Read a full review of The Hurt here.BUY NOW from AmazonHard Men of Rugby, published by Y LolfaColin Meads or Bakkies Botha? Jerry Collins or Bobby Windsor? Luke Upton brings a favourite pub discussion to print as he tells the stories behind some of the hardest men to play our sport. Twenty worthy players are profiled although not the man whom referee Nigel Owens, who provides the foreword, says was the hardest of them all… Richie McCaw.Read a full review of Hard Men of Rugby here.BUY NOW from AmazonKen Scotland: The Autobiography, published by PolarisReminders of a bygone age – when Ken Scotland was in the Army, a pie and pint in the NAFFI cost seven and a half pence! The full-back cum stand-off is a top-rank Hall of Famer, starring for Scotland and the 1959 Lions, and at 84 has finally decided to shed light on his wondrous career. He shows the same delicate touch as he did on the field all those decades ago.Read a full review of Ken Scotland’s autobiography here.BUY NOW from AmazonA Break in Mendoza, published by The Endless BookcaseAn inspirational read from a smaller independent publisher. Carl Igolen-Robinson tells the harrowing story of his son Luke, who broke his neck while playing in a school match in faraway Argentina. The book charts a year in Luke’s life as he tries to put his life back together. All royalties from sales go to the RFU Injured Players Foundation.BUY NOW from AmazonSean O’Brien: Fuel, published by SandycoveFrom Bog Lane to Brentford. Seán O’Brien explains his journey from rural County Carlow to big-city life with London Irish, along the way becoming an iconic hard man for Leinster and Ireland. And his Lions try in the first Test of 2017 is one for the ages. Funny to think that if Gaelic football was a professional sport he might never have bothered with rugby…center_img Looking for great rugby books, whether for yourself or as a gift? There was some top rugby literature published in 2020, so here’s a bundle of books worth forking out for Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Episcopal Relief & Development highlights partners in Myanmar/Burma

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Episcopal Relief & Development] This month’s Power of Partnerships celebrates the success of an innovative program in Myanmar/Burma to boost crop production and improve soil quality through the use of Effective Microorganism (EM) technology.  “Starter” bacteria strengthen the helpful microbes in the local soil and make a nutrient-rich, low-cost fertilizer that can double harvests within three years.  Episcopal Relief & Development is working with the Church of the Province of Myanmar to support a demonstration farm that offers on-site training and mobile workshops to help farmers implement the new methodology and adopt other practices that reduce the impact of drought.Please note that the Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features are now on an alternating schedule.  The next Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development will be published later in July.The Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features present stories about the agency’s partners in the US and worldwide. Visit www.er-d.org to read past installments, find information about our programs or make a contribution.  You can also call 1.855.312.HEAL (4325). Gifts can be mailed to Episcopal Relief & Development, PO Box 7058, Merrifield, VA 22116-7058. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Relief & Development highlights partners in Myanmar/Burma Posted Jul 5, 2012 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Episcopal Relief & Development Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

All Saints Church puts ‘heart and soul’ into St. Louis…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ethnic Ministries Featured Events Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Seven-year-old Chelsea West (second from right) learns to play the guitar with other young members from the neighborhood around All Saints Episcopal Church in St. Louis.[Episcopal News Service] For 7-year-old Chelsea West, learning to play guitar at All Saints Episcopal Church in St. Louis, Missouri, is a grand invitation into a wondrous new world.“I’m learning the E string and the B string,” the second-grader proclaimed excitedly during a Feb. 25 telephone interview with the Episcopal News Service. “It’s fun. I wanted to take the class because I don’t have anything to do when I go home. I like working with Miss Jillian because she makes guitar fun. I want to be able to sing and play the guitar.”Jillian Smith, an Episcopal Service Corps intern who serves part time at All Saints, said that sometimes “Chelsea will say, this is hard, this is so hard. We’ll be in the middle of learning something and then suddenly she’ll say, ‘I’ve got it. I’ve got it’ and she looks at me, and it’s wonderful.”All Saints’ Music and Arts Village offers free classes for underserved youth aged 7-11 in North St. Louis. “The Arts Village is designed for underprivileged families who could not otherwise afford music lessons,” she said.Jillian Smith, an Episcopal Service Corps intern who serves part time at All Saints, shows positive encouragement during music classes.“It is just one way All Saints is really embodying a lot of what the church should do,” Smith added. “They are really putting their heart and soul into the community and neighborhood and trying to do the best they can for the people in this area.”It wouldn’t be the first time the 140-year-old historically black congregation saw a need and responded. In 1945, when local banks declined to offer financial services to African Americans, All Saints founded a credit union for that express purpose, according to Pat Heeter, church historian and a third-generation member.Back in the day, the congregation was like family, recalled Heeter, who at 71 is happy to be actively engaged as junior warden and in the Episcopal Church Women. “I’m going to serve my church as best I can,” she said.(Founded in 1874, the church is the third to be featured in the Episcopal News Service’s series of historically black congregations during February, Black History Month. Others include the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia, the first historically black congregation in the nation, founded in 1792 by the Rev. Absalom Jones, and St. Barnabas, in Pasadena, California, founded in 1923 by seven women in a living room.)They are among 90 historically black congregations still in existence, churches founded by African Americans post-slavery and during racial segregation in the United States because they were not welcome in mainstream Episcopal churches.Like many historically black congregations, All Saints’ story converges with the social and politic realities of its community, of the nation and of the Episcopal Church.It was the first African American Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Missouri and west of the Mississippi, and has occupied at least six sites, according to Heeter. It moved as membership swelled – to a high of 900-plus members in 1961.At one point, members declined to participate in what was largely viewed as an attempt to create “a racial episcopate” after All Saints hosted the consecration of Rt. Rev. Edward Thomas Demby as the first black bishop suffragan in the continental United States.That was in 1918 and Demby, who served in the Diocese of Arkansas, was “the suffragan bishop for colored work” and was appointed “jurisdiction for all African-American congregations in the Province of the Southwest,” according to a history compiled by Heeter.“All Saints did not wish to be turned over formally to the suffragan bishop of Arkansas” but considered itself part of the Diocese of Missouri, according to the history. However, the parish financially supported Demby’s ministry.By then, All Saints was well known and had already occupied several locations. It grew out of a Sunday school begun in 1871 by James Thompson, an administrator and teacher at a “free colored school” in Louisiana, Missouri, about 100 miles north of St. Louis.Thompson became the first African-American deacon and priest in the Diocese of Missouri, which at the time encompassed the entire state.Initial services were held in Trinity Episcopal Church as Our Savior mission. In just a year’s time, the church outgrew the spot and moved to a former Jewish synagogue where there was a name change – they worshiped as the Good Samaritan mission.In 1882, a third building was purchased. Shortly afterwards, the mission was incorporated as All Saints Parish. By 1901, a rectory had been built beside the church.Five years later, membership had grown to about 250 communicants and another move, to the former Messiah Unitarian Church building, increased seating capacity. “The Unitarians had spent more than $100,000 to erect this building,” according to the Heeter’s history.“The building passed with all its furnishings, including the grand organ, into the possession of All Saints’. Three thousand dollars was spent in remodeling the interior and adapting the chancel to the requirements of the worship of the church. At this time All Saints’ voted itself self-sustaining, relinquishing all aid from the Missionary Board and has remained self-sustaining ever since.”In 1917, the Rev. Douchette Redmond Clarke of Philadelphia became rector, and was “like my grandfather,” Heeter recalled. “He was close with our family because my father’s father died. My father was a very little boy, so the male image in his household became Fr. Clarke.”A retired school psychologist, Heeter has painstakingly researched historical photos and documents while developing a church archives to preserve the church’s story. There were formative years when the name All Saints immediately telegraphed the church’s mission and identity throughout the community, she recalled.“I was in the youth choir and we had a very active Sunday school for children and adults and a young teenage group. Our church was the gathering place for the youth of the area,” she recalled. “They didn’t necessarily belong to the church. Our youth group met and we had dances in the parish hall, and that kept us off the street.“I’ve even run into people who weren’t members and they’d say, ‘do you remember the dances at All Saints?’ Even when I left and went away to college and attended another Episcopal church in Denver, I still told people my church was All Saints, St. Louis,” she said.Christine Crenshaw, 80, whose parents and grandparents were also members, also recalled the days when church was both a family affair and an identity.“We had a strong Sunday school and … I remember my grandmother took me on the streetcar every Sunday morning. We never missed church.”She remembered hearing how the church helped out after her grandfather’s death at an early age. “My grandmother had to make it as best she could without a husband,” she recalled. “But every holiday the church brought baskets of food and turkey.”She has served on the altar guild for nearly six decades and proudly notes that her grandsons – and a daughter – were acolytes, she said. “I enjoyed going to church,” Crenshaw said. “That was a big thing for me. It was a very, very prestigious church. When you said All Saints, it meant something, that was big time.”All Saints Church as it is today.Being church in the 21st centuryHeeter’s parents, Solomon and Lucille James, established a tradition as church movers and shakers. “My father was an acolyte, a vestry person, and did volunteer work with buildings and grounds, as well as serving as a board member of the credit union,” Heeter recalled.Her mother was altar guild president, participated in the St. Ann’s Guild and “something we used to call the Women’s Auxiliary that turned into the ECW” as well as becoming church liaison for a community program that provided home care for cancer patients, she said. “They used to make bandages and lap blankets for the patients.”In addition to written records – births, marriages, deaths – Heeter is in possession of the original church font, she believes. But portions of the written history are missing, and Heeter has even enlisted the aid of a local PBS television station in her efforts to recover historical photos of the church’s past.Parts of that history tell the story of ministries that soared and others that, after outliving their usefulness, ended. Like Bethany Mission, a church plant in 1921 that closed five years later. And, like the All Saints Credit Union, faced with stiff competition after mainstream financial institutions no longer excluded African Americans, which closed in 2007.Heeter said the baptismal font – at which she was baptized – and other memorabilia, currently “is packed away because we don’t have space.”A room designated for the archives doubles as the music room where Chelsea West and about a dozen other students pluck guitars and learn valuable life lessons – a sign of the times for the 140-year-old church facing changed circumstances, according to the rector, the Rev. Michael Dunnington.Four years ago, the senior warden invited him to serve as rector and added: “I don’t know if it makes any difference that we’re a historically African-American church,” Dunnington recalled. “I was going to joke that, it’s OK, because I’m a historically white priest.”True to history, the church again finds itself attempting to respond to community needs, he said.“We’re struggling,” Dunnington said. With an average Sunday attendance of about 65, meeting in a 1930s-era building with “leaky roofs and malfunctioning boilers … part of the question that floats around here is, ‘what is the place for an African-American church, founded really because of segregation? You want to preserve the history, but that’s the question.“Like any parish of our age and our congregants, we’re facing the challenges of where do we go from here and what does it mean to be church in the 21st century?”The answer, at least in part, has been mission.Parishioners, many of whom commute, “have been really good with responding to the challenges of taking a missional approach to this neighborhood” which remains largely African-American and poor, Dunnington said.Outreach has included hosting community picnics and seasonal events, like a Halloween ‘Trunk or Treat’ safe neighborhood party. A food pantry ministry has expanded to include health screenings and flu shots and the Arts and Music Village is also hoping to expand.It takes a village … and a churchThe All Saints Arts and Music Village is, for Chelsea West, a “fun” place.“I made a lot of friends in the class,” she said. “I’m learning the first two strings on the guitar and we’re learning notes on those right now. We haven’t gotten to singing yet.”Students meet after school on Tuesdays and Thursdays. There are snacks along with keyboard and guitar lessons. Intern Jillian Smith, 22, a cellist from Tennessee, said music has been such a big part of her life that she wanted to share it with others.“I try to instill in them that they can do this,” said Smith. “I have them say, ‘yes I can’ all the time and I let them know how proud I am of them. It’s so good to know that you have the ability to do something; that somebody believes in you. They are so talented and smart and sweet.”Music “really is a new way of thinking; it’s such a process,” she said. “You have to count beats, to remember which note goes where, and why, and the timing. I explain to the students that music is a cool, different language.“It can teach you so much. It can help in your subjects in school, like learning another language; it can help you set goals, and achieve normally what you otherwise wouldn’t be able to achieve.”A recent recital added a goal-setting exercise outside the academic world, added Smith.Sharing the “love and joy that can come from music” means a lot to her, too, she added. “I’m happy everyday that I have this job. The church really is doing a lot of good stuff here, to reach out and be a resource to the community and neighborhood like this. It’s one of the big things the church can do, be a voice for the neighborhood.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Black History Month, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 26, 2014 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME All Saints Church puts ‘heart and soul’ into St. Louis neighborhood Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Grace Cathedral dean to become Stanford’s dean for religious life

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Tags Janet M. Diehl says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Grace Cathedral dean to become Stanford’s dean for religious life [Stanford University Press release] The Very Rev. Dr. Jane Shaw, dean of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, has been named dean for religious life at Stanford University, Provost John Etchemendy announced today. Shaw will also be joining the faculty in Stanford’s Department of Religious Studies.Shaw, a historian and theologian who is at present also a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, has served as dean of the Episcopal Grace Cathedral since 2010. She previously taught at the University of Oxford.Shaw, 51, will succeed the Rev. William “Scotty” McLennan Jr., who is stepping down after 14 years. She will assume her position as Stanford’s spiritual leader this fall.At Stanford, Shaw will provide spiritual, religious and ethical leadership to the university community, serve as minister of Memorial Church and also teach undergraduates and graduate students as a professor of religious studies.“We are lucky to have found in Jane Shaw both a charismatic leader and an accomplished academic to lead our Office for Religious Life,” said Etchemendy. “Dean Shaw is equally committed to the educational mission of the university and the ecumenical mission of Memorial Church.”“I am delighted to be joining Stanford as dean for religious life,” Shaw said. “The opportunity to serve at this extraordinary university is a great privilege. It will be my pleasure to work with so many wonderful colleagues and students to relate religious and ethical questions to the cutting-edge work being done at Stanford University, and to provide spiritual leadership for this exceptional academic community. I am also thrilled to be joining the excellent Religious Studies Department as a professor.”At Grace Cathedral, Shaw has been responsible for overseeing its mission, vision and spiritual life, and has provided leadership to the extended community of an iconic house of prayer known locally, nationally and internationally. The inclusive Grace Cathedral congregation is known for welcoming pilgrims, seekers and believers; embracing innovation; fostering open-minded conversation; and putting beliefs into action.During her time as dean of Grace Cathedral, Shaw has overseen growth in all areas of the cathedral community’s life, not least in its artistic, cultural and educational events, which have tripled over the past four years. She founded a resident artist program, and also developed educational programming that related questions of values and ethics to the issues of the day, such as the environment and technology.“Jane Shaw will bring her vision, broad experience and deep commitment to service to the Office for Religious Life,” said William Damon, a professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford and co-chair of the search committee for the position. “The Stanford community will be enhanced by her spiritual leadership.”Shaw joined Grace Cathedral from the University of Oxford, where she taught history and theology for 16 years and was Dean of Divinity and Fellow of New College. A historian of modern religion, she is the author ofMiracles in Enlightenment England (Yale, 2006); Octavia, Daughter of God: The Story of a Female Messiah and Her Followers (Yale, 2011), which won the San Francisco Book Festival History Prize; and A Practical Christianity: Meditations for the Season of Lent (Morehouse, 2012).Shaw has given several lectures at Stanford on topics including the role of the modern cathedral and reasons behind the 20th-century flight from institutional religion. In 2009, Shaw delivered the Palm Sunday sermon in Memorial Church. While at Stanford this spring, on a short sabbatical leave from Grace Cathedral, she has been researching the moral imagination, a project she is working on with actress, playwright and Grace Cathedral trustee Anna Deavere Smith. Shaw is also working on a book on spirituality and mysticism in the early 20th century.Shaw was educated as an undergraduate at Oxford; she holds an MDiv from Harvard and a PhD in history from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been awarded honorary doctorates by Colgate University and Episcopal Divinity School. Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (2) Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI John Warfel says: center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 22, 2014 at 2:54 pm Excellent choice! Rector Hopkinsville, KY Theological Education Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Jul 21, 2014 Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 People, Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 22, 2014 at 9:23 am The same as Barbara’s comment. Too much is missing at the end of each line to even guess what has been written. I do hope it can be resolved and resent corrected!! Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more