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JOB VACANCY: HILLCREST HOUSE NURSING HOME LOOKING TO RECRUIT

first_imgJOB VACANCY: Hillcrest House Nursing Home is seeking to recruit an experienced Registered nurse to join their established team. Job Responsibilities:Candidates must have current registration with An Bord AltranaisExperience in the Care of Older Persons is essentialDiploma/ Cert in Gerontology will be an advantageExcellent remuneration package of €39 – 42k/pro rataFor further information, please contact Anne Gallagher (Director) on 0872584843 or by email to [email protected] Closing date for applications April 10th 2015About Hillcrest House Nursing Home:A warm welcome awaits you at Hillcrest House Nursing Home.Hillcrest House Nursing Home is a purpose built facility set in quiet, discreet grounds on the outskirts of Letterkenny. The home is situated within very short drive of the local hospitals, shops, post offices, churches and the High street.We offer each individual a home in which to live as active a life as possible, to entertain family and friends, with the comfort of 24 hour Professional Nursing, Care and Support.It is this sense of homeliness, comfort and ease that creates the welcoming warmth and friendliness for which Hillcrest House is renowned and which is cherished by residents and friends alike.    JOB VACANCY: HILLCREST HOUSE NURSING HOME LOOKING TO RECRUIT was last modified: March 30th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessFeaturesjobsnewslast_img read more

Anti-Biblical Bias Shaped Geological Opinion

first_imgGeologists resisted evidence for catastrophic flooding because they wanted to distance themselves from Genesis.We’ve recounted the story of J Harlan Bretz several times over the years. His unconventional hypothesis about the origin of the Channeled Scablands in eastern Washington by catastrophic floods was resisted by the consensus of geological opinion. Now, two geologists propose that the massive canyons there and on Mars did not take as much water as previously believed. The write-ups of their findings reinforce what we’ve stated about anti-Biblical bias against catastrophism. Perron and Vinditti write in Nature,When the geologist J Harlen Bretz proposed in the 1920s that the Channeled Scablands were created by a catastrophic flood, his ideas were attacked relentlessly by geologists who subscribed to the mainstream view that erosion is slow and steady, and who wanted to distance their profession from the notion of a biblical deluge.Bretz’s triumph over his critics provides a classic case of a maverick overcoming a reigning paradigm through his personal courage and persistence, wielding incontrovertible evidence.The new consensus about the Scablands is strong, but needs modification, Perron and Vinditti say.Although the flood origin of the Channeled Scablands is no longer disputed, the sizes of the individual floods remain uncertain. It has become common practice to place an upper bound on the flow rate of the floods by assuming that they filled the present-day canyons to the brim. Estimated flood magnitudes based on this assumption range up to 60 cubic kilometres per hour — nearly 100 times the average flow rate of the Amazon River today. But these estimates might be much too large. Glaciologists have argued that it is difficult for ice sheets to store enough water to produce such enormous floods. The brimful-flood model also requires the unlikely scenario that each flood passing through the canyons was larger than the one that preceded it, because the canyon deepens as each successive flood erodes the bedrock.Now, Isaac Larsen (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) and Michael Lamb (Caltech) argue that about 5 to 10 times less water was required to carve the big canyons. Writing in Nature, they propose a “threshold shear stress model” to replace the brimful model. Their model has implications for other canyons on Earth, and for fluid-carved canyons on Mars as well.The threshold shear stress model implies that canyons in the Channeled Scablands were eroded by floods with depths that were a fraction of the relief of the final canyon (Fig. 4). This physics-based finding is consistent with several recent investigations of canyon carving at other sites on Earth and Mars: for example, those where bedrock incision by plucking or toppling of jointed rock occurs at depths less than brim-full, those where terrace chronology indicates multiple episodes of canyon incision, or those where lakes in breached craters contain insufficient water volumes to fill downstream channels.Our results suggest that the morphology of canyons (for example, terraces, valley shapes and slope profiles) on Earth and Mars could reveal information about both the history and discharge of flooding that warrants further investigation. The outburst floods that carved the Channeled Scablands were extraordinary under either end-member model, but predictions of discharges from the threshold shear stress model are five- to ten-fold smaller. On Mars, owing to the low permeability of aquifers, it has been challenging to reconcile the very large reconstructed brim-full discharges in outflow channels with a subsurface flood source. Given the proposed similarity in incision mechanics for outflow channels on Mars and in the Channeled Scablands, the threshold shear stress model provides a link between the physics of groundwater-sourced floods and terraces observed in orbital data, implying longer duration, lower discharge floods, or multiple floods on early Mars.NASA’s Astrobiology Magazine sums it up this way: “A new model of canyon-forming floods from UMass Amherst and CalTech researchers suggests that deep canyons can be formed in bedrock by significantly less water than previously thought.” Two consequences of this change of view seem evident. For one, it no longer seems necessary to presume that Mars had as much water as previously thought. A second implication is that floods on Earth can accomplish much more geological change with far less water. Rethinking the amount of water required “could reveal information about both the history and discharge of flooding that warrants further investigation.” This sounds like a shot in the arm for catastrophism.It’s not necessary to propose multiple floods (“tens of floods”) for the Channeled Scablands. Larsen and Lamb cite a 1985 paper by one guy for that idea. The important point is the tremendous power of water. If only 10% or 20% of the amount previously assumed could carve the Channeled Scablands, then it follows that a global flood would have correspondingly more power to alter Earth’s crust and sediments. It becomes more credible to associate a single catastrophe with the miles of sediments and deep canyons found all over the Earth, particularly on the Colorado Plateau where they are exposed so well with flat contacts speaking of a short period of time. Creation geologist Steve Austin mentioned “plucking” decades ago as a process that can accelerate bedrock erosion.Notice the anti-Biblical bias of the geologists of Bretz’s day. Perron and Vinditti say his views were “attacked relentlessly” because they seemed to support a Biblical flood account. The attacks went on for decades! Bretz stood alone against the establishment between the 1920s and the 1960s, when his views were finally accepted. (Remember that this was the period between the Scopes Trial and the Darwin Centennial.) We should not be discouraged if today’s secular materialists exhibit the same visceral reaction against intelligent design or creation geology. It’s hard to overcome an entrenched, powerful worldview. Its proponents sometimes never change. New views often gain traction one funeral at a time. Creation speakers have seen younger students be much more accepting of young-earth evidences than their hoary old dogmatic professors. We must keep the evidence out there where open minded young people can see it.Resource: Dr. Terry Mortenson’s DVD “Deep Time Evolution” from AiG has damning quotes from secular geologists from the 1790s and beyond, showing that they had made up their minds to hate Genesis before even looking at the evidence. Mortenson’s PhD specialty is the history of geology (see also his book The Great Turning Point for even more citations). He explains how evolutionists and creationists both have the same evidence, but their worldview drives their interpretation of the evidence. It takes courageous mavericks like J Harlan Bretz to stand against a crowd. Unfortunately, even Bretz did not take the implications of his finds far enough. Had he examined even larger canyons than the scablands, he might have been led to propose a world-wide flood. (Visited 96 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Selling corn before harvest

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC The USDA increased the export demand pace for corn. Should the U.S. produce a trend line corn yield of 174 bushels per acre this year, then carryout would drop from the current level of 2.1 billion to just below 1.6 billion by next summer. If that were to happen, then corn is undervalued.However, the nearly perfect growing conditions across 90% of the Corn Belt is keeping prices down at the moment. The corn crop is setting itself up for a 180-bushel per acre national average estimate, which would mean 500 million more bushels and a carryout over 2 billion. If that would occur then Dec corn is overvalued today.On June 29 we will learn if the U.S. farmers planted more corn acres than estimated in the spring by the USDA. Expectations are that an increase of a half million to 1 million additional acres might have been planted. That would translate into an additional 100 to 200 million bushels to the carryout. This is not something that will help those looking for something to help rally this marketIn four of the last nine years (2009, 2013, 2014 and 2016) Dec corn futures drifted lower from mid-June through harvest. Weather analog years show 2009 and 2014 having similar weather conditions to this year so far.In five of the last nine years (2010, 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2017) Dec corn had a pop in prices at some point later in the summer. Weather forecasts should be biggest driver of the corn market going forward. There is a lot of summer to go and it’s still hot in many parts of the Corn Belt, but rain makes grain.The trade war certainly isn’t helping the situation but the amount of corn exported is small in relationship to beans on a percentage basis. The U.S. produces over 30% of the world’s corn and soybeans, it’s not as simple as not buying our product. Why I want to sell corn before harvestOver the last two weeks I’ve explained why I use average yields as estimates when selling corn prior to harvest. I’ve explained that there are a lot of advantages for selling before harvest.Historically, the best futures levels tend to occur during the middle of summer. Over the last 30 years, the price for new crop corn has been higher in May than October 75% of the time. Conversely, storing corn, hoping for a rally where prices the following spring are higher than at harvest, only happened 50% of the time. When a farmer stores corn they need to also factor in either the cost of commercial storage or home storage and the interest paid on the value of the stored grain. Either way this extra cost reduces the chances for better prices from harvest to spring to less than 50%. Even in the last 10 years only 2010 and 2011 saw significantly higher prices after harvest that exceeded those of the summer before harvest. Taking advantage of market carry premium and basis flexibilityFarmers can also take advantage of market carry premium in the market. That is when future months are worth more than current months. This opportunity is only available if a farmer has sold their corn by harvest.There is also the benefit of basis increasing after harvest, which happens in most years, even if futures prices don’t rally.When considering the profit opportunity potential of market carry and basis there is a better chance to maximize profitability by selling before harvest than waiting until after, hoping for a rally while paying storage costs and interest.Despite these benefits, a lot of farmers are fearful of committing to selling their grain before harvest. Why I don’t worry about selling my grain before harvestCrop InsuranceMy crop insurance protects all sales up to 80% of my normal APH yield, so as long as I don’t sell over 80% of my APH yields, then my sales are covered against a rally. This doesn’t mean I will get to take advantage of those higher prices, only that I don’t have to worry about coming up with bushels to cover the sales I made if I don’t raise the crop. Missing out on future ralliesOften farmers fear missing out on futures rallies, so they wait. But from my perspective, every time I sell I could be potentially missing out on a future rally regardless of the time of year. Nobody knows when the highs and lows of the market will occur. Therefore, since I’m willing to presell 80% of my grain before harvest, I can still take advantage of future rallies, but they’ll just be on next year’s crop instead of this year. Pre-selling doesn’t keep me from profiting on rallies when they come, it just may change which year I use it. Breakeven uncertaintyI use averages from the last three years and assume a minor inflation increase. I make sure to include all expenses, including fair market rental value for owned land, cost of living expenses, equipment custom rates, etc. In the end, I’m usually really close every year. My biggest expense variable can be fertilizer prices. Still, even a $100 per ton price shift, which is pretty big, only adjusts my breakeven price by 11 cents or about $20 per acre. I can eliminate this risk buy purchasing in advance. Final yield uncertaintyYields actually have the biggest effect on my breakeven prices, more than any other variable. For every bushel produced above or below my average production, my breakeven price changes 2 cents or $3.50 per acre. Instead of letting this significant variable keep me from selling before harvest I use average yields for planning. I reserve the extra profits when yields are high, and pull from those reserves during dry years. This takes some discipline to do, but the extra profit potential makes it worth it for me.I think the benefits of selling before harvest outweigh the negatives. The market usually trades above my breakeven point at least once during the marketing year, so I try to take advantage when it does. 2017 might have been the first year in a very long time where that didn’t happen. So far in 2018 the market has already traded above the average farmers’ breakeven point and there is no guarantee it will happen again.Since weather is the main driver for corn prices and completely unpredictable, I need to have a grain marketing strategy in place that provides the best chances of profit potential every year. For me historically there is a lot of rationale to support selling most of my corn before harvest. Granted it takes discipline and planning, but it’s worth it for the increased chances to maximize profitability for my farm operation and minimize my risk exposure. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

New LED Lights on the Scene

first_imgPhilips CFLs last a long timeI’m proud to say that for the last 16 years, the original Philips CFL light bulb that I bought in 1999 has been on a motion sensor in my back yard, extremely exposed to the elements, protecting us from marauding raccoons. It is still going strong. In this next wave of LEDs, my money’s on Philips — for their commitment to quality and durability. In 1999, I went through the back service doors of Wolf Electric, a local supplier, and fumbled my way along the poorly lit, uneven floors to drop $37 and tax for one light bulb: a compact fluorescent light (CFL) made by Philips.For me, this was the start of energy-efficient lighting. That moment in time might even have represented the apogee of CFLs. Store shelves today are littered with crappy CFL lights that aren’t dimmable, are filled with hazardous mercury, and include ballasts that give off so much waste heat that the white plastic base quickly gets cooked to a yellow crisp as the bulbs sputter to an early death. So much for energy conservation. BY GREG LABBE Air Leaks in Homes Insulated With Spray FoamOrigami-Inspired HomesPastiche Architecture RELATED ARTICLES Martin’s 10 Rules of LightingRethinking Recessed LightingLED Filament BulbsFuture of LEDs: Lower Cost, Higher EfficacyAre LEDs Worth Their Extra Cost?LED Lighting Getting Better and BetterGBA Product Guide: LED Lighting No need for an airtight hat in the atticLotus LED Lights (Surrey, B.C.) has been retailing some exciting low-profile pot lights that could substantially reduce the fussiness of installing pot lights.It should be noted that good quality LEDs typically have aluminum heat sinks, and for good reason: the heat needs to dissipate. So take this next sentence with a grain of salt: These new lights could potentially eliminate the need for a large housing box that punctuates the air barrier system and projects into the attic, disturbing the uniform layer of continuous insulation and leaking conditioned air like a sieve.Sadly, many electricians don’t understand the need for air sealing. These new faux-pot lights might be able to help them in new construction, because many models install directly in the drywall and are plugged into a proprietary low-voltage junction box. That simple!What’s really exciting is that these lights may offer the opportunity to easily eliminate 90% of the air leakage that occurs through existing pot lights by simply retrofitting these new types of LEDs. Coming from a guy who made a living by sending other guys into hot, itchy attics to air seal the backs of pot lights — the LED product from Cree shown in the photo at the top of the page seems like a no-brainer retrofit solution. Greg Labbé is co-owner of BlueGreen Consulting Group, a high-performance home consulting firm that works with architects, builders, and homeowners to optimize the energy performance of new and existing homes through detailed energy modeling and site testing. Suddenly, LEDs have arrivedBut hang on… Is it just us, or did 2015 usher in a new era of LED lighting? It seems that LEDs have jumped out of the dark ages by offering dimmable features and lighting systems that tie into home automation and can change hue in response to commands from a smart phone. These LEDs produce a truly beautiful light that doesn’t oscillate — light that is good enough to permit one to read a book (that is, a durable, sharable, battery-less device made of bound paper, having stories printed in ink). And let’s not forget the fact that these mercury-free lights could be substantially more durable than CFLs.As readers may imagine, pot lights (also known as recessed can lights) installed through the air barrier of a home’s topmost ceiling have been a big pet peeve of mine — not because I don’t like the lights, but because they kill home performance. The great news is that some of the new LED lights that have flooded the market recently might be able to significantly reduce heat loss due to air leakage.last_img read more

Stunt video on Mumbai trains:railway police arrests 70 people

first_imgSoon after dangerous stunts on Mumbai trains were exposed, railway authorities have swung into action. After Headlines Today featured the stunts video, the railways have gone on a drive in Mumbai to catch the offenders. During the last two days, the Government Railway Police (GRP) has arrested nearly 70 youth, who carry out death-defying stunts on trains. A 13-year-old boy, Zahid Ansari, who appeared on a video doing what is popularly called ‘train surfing’, even landed in hospital while trying to imitate many others and is battling for his life. Headlines Today had shown how young Mumbaikars hang out of fast-moving trains and move about dangerously hitting poles along the railway lines. Many of them confessed to Headlines Today that they indulged in the dangerous act just to impress women. Train surfing In a desperate attempt to garner their 15 seconds of fame in cyberspace, some youths wish to join a select group of desperadoes from around the world who call themselves ‘train surfers’. Train surfing is not a sport but an act of putting life in grave danger by some thrill-seeking youngsters. On the net, this is generally referred to as an extreme sports, which involves riding outside speeding trains.  Mostly young male adults indulge in this deadly sport, film them, and upload them immediately on popular video uploading sites.  Recently, a 13-year-old boy lost his arm in South Africa, when he touched a high-voltage cable, while running atop a moving train. In October last year, 21-year-old Nilesh Jagtap from Mumbai tried to outrun an oncoming local train, in a bid to do an Aamir Khan act, while copying his train-chasing stunt from 1998 film Ghulaam. He died in the act. Train surfing has been officially declared illegal and banned in many countries. In India, while there is no specific law against it, it still is an illegal act.advertisementlast_img read more

Nonbinary activist savours victoryPretty amazing to see life from both sides

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. – From early childhood, Gemma Hickey rebelled against wearing dresses and never felt female.It was a misfit sensation of not belonging that Hickey wants to spare other kids — starting with their birth certificates.Hickey describes as a “big victory” what happened Friday in a St. John’s courtroom that could go a long way to ease stigmas and increase acceptance for those who linger between genders.Hickey’s legal challenge of the province’s Vital Statistics Act, which allows birth certificates only to have male or female sex designations, was delayed at provincial Supreme Court in St. John’s while the province enshrines another option.Newfoundland and Labrador’s Liberal government said Thursday it will bring in legislation this fall allowing for a change of sex designation to non-binary.Hickey hopes other provinces will follow suit — only the Northwest Territories now allows gender-neutral birth certificates.“It’s a proud day for Newfoundland and Labrador,” Hickey told reporters. “We weren’t the first place in Canada to do it, but second is pretty good and I feel very happy today. I feel very validated.”Hickey was also celebrating the debut of the documentary “Just be Gemma” airing Saturday on local CBC television (Newfoundland and Labrador). It will be available for viewing online as part of CBC’s “Absolutely” documentary series.Produced by Nine Island Communications, it traces Hickey’s physical transition from female to non-binary — neither male nor female — beginning in 2015. The journey starts with testosterone shots before surgery to remove the breasts Hickey says never felt right.Hickey recalls never identifying as female, and recounts being sexually assaulted for the first time at the age of five by an older boy who lived on their street. Years later, a priest who had taken special interest in Hickey, buying presents and offering visits at his home, became an abuser.Hickey describes falling asleep one night on his couch, and awakening with him “on top of me.”“I just thought: ‘Oh my God.’ He had a cross around his neck and it would hit my face. That’s what I remember, is just the cross hitting my chin.”Hickey took that trauma and, as an adult, formed the Pathways Foundation to support survivors of clergy sexual abuse. In 2015, Hickey walked 930 kilometres across Newfoundland raising funds for the group.Hickey talks in the documentary about wanting to be called “they” rather than he or she.“It’s pretty amazing to see life from both sides, so why do I have to pick one?”It’s an awkward transition for Hickey’s mother, Lynda Hayward. She still refers at times in the film to her “daughter” but accompanies Hickey to Ontario for plastic surgery and is often seen offering support and love.Hickey’s father, too, tells Gemma: “I love you, honey,” just before Hickey has plastic surgery to remove breast tissue and create a more masculine chest. There’s a swimming scene months later at an outdoor pond.“I felt free, like I was flying,” Hickey says of the feel of water on a bare chest.Hickey’s maternal grandmother inspired the documentary’s title.“I may not want to be a girl or a boy,” Hickey recalls telling her.“Just be Gemma,” was the grandmother’s response. “That’s all any of us wants.”Under the province’s proposed changes to the Vital Statistics Act, sex information will still be collected at birth, but people 12 and older will be able to choose an ‘X’ on their birth certificate. Children aged 12 to 15 will still require a parent to apply on their behalf, with the child’s consent required.The government also said it will remove the requirement for a statement from a medical professional prior to a sex-designation change for those 16 and older. Hickey said that change is particularly important because such a prerequisite “pathologizes” gender identity.“People can decide for themselves how they choose to identify.”Those changes would short-circuit the legal fight with Hickey, who argues the Vital Statistics Act contravenes the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.Hickey does not identify as solely male or female and was believed to be the first person in Canada to apply for a non-binary birth certificate.“Our rights are never given to us, so we have to fight for them,” said Hickey, who turns 41 on Oct. 1.“It’s a big victory for myself and other non-binary Canadians — particularly young people out there who are struggling with their own identity and don’t feel that they have a place.“We’re carving out that place and we’re doing that today.”Watching from the public gallery was Hickey supporter Stacey Piercey, who hopes other provinces will act soon.“It’s necessary. There’s so many gender variances and identities. It’s important to accept these kids and love these kids and make them part of our community.”Ontario’s minister of government and consumer services, Tracy MacCharles, has said gender-neutral birth certificates could be issued in Ontario as early as next year.In B.C., Kori Doty, a parent who identifies as transgender and prefers the pronoun they, refused to provide the sex of their child Searyl to the government when the baby was born in November.On Aug. 31, the federal government began allowing gender-neutral passports, the latest step in Ottawa’s plan to eventually allow individuals to identify their sex as ‘X’ — that is, unspecified — on government-issued documents.The move stems from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s pledge to better reflect gender diversity across the country.Follow @suebailey on Twitter.last_img read more